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" O unexpected stroke, worse than of death ! Must I thus leave thee, Paradise? thus leave Thee, native soil, these happy walks and shades, Fit haunt of gods? where I had hope to spend, Quiet though sad, the respite of that day That must be mortal to us... "
Paradise lost, a poem. With the life of the author [by E. Fenton]. - Page 253
by John Milton - 1800
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Synonymisches Handwörterbuch der englischen Sprache für die Deutschen

H M. Melford - 1841 - 448 pages
...every war being so short. (Swtft.) Give me leave to allow myself no respite from labour. (Spectator.) I had hope to spend Quiet , though sad , the respite of that day, That must be mortal to us both. (Milton.) 1. To INTRODUCE, 2. PRESENT. 1. ©nfufyren , befannt tnadjett, fcotfiiljren;...
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Select Works of the British Poets: In a Chronological Series from Ben Jonson ...

John Aikin - 1841 - 807 pages
...place of her relire. " Î unexpected stroke, worse than of Death : Must I Ihus leave thee, Paradise ? thus leave Thee, native soil! these happy walks and shades, Fit haunt of gods Ï where I had hope to spend, Quiet though sad, the respite of that day That must be mortal to us both....
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De Clifford; or, The constant man, by the author of 'Tremaine'.

Robert Plumer Ward - 1841
...lamentation of Eve, on her banishment from the abode of her happiness. . " Must I thus leave thee, Paradise ? thus leave Thee, native soil, these happy walks and shades, Fit haunt of Gods ? How shall I part, and whither wander down Into a lower world, to this obscure And wild. How shall...
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De Clifford: Or, The Constant Man, Volume 1

Robert Plumer Ward - 1841
...lamentation of Eve, on her banishment from the abode of her happiness. " Must I thus leave thee, Paradise ? thus leave Thee, native soil, these happy walks and shades, Fit haunt of Gods ? How shall I part, and wither wander down Into a lower world, to this obscure And wild. How shall...
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The World's Best Poetry ...

1904
...! Must I thus leave thee, Paradise? thus leave Thee, native soil! these happy walks and shades. Pit haunt of gods; where I had hope to spend. Quiet, though sad, the respite of that day That must be mortal to us both? O flowers, That never will in other climate grow, My early visitation, and my...
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A Day Book of Milton

John Milton - 1905 - 366 pages
...thus leave thee, Paradise ? thus leave Thee, native soil, these happy walks and shades, Fit haunts of gods ? where I had hope to spend, Quiet though sad, the respite of that day That must be mortal to us both. O flowers, That never will in other climate grow, My early visitation, and my...
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Synonyms Discriminated: A Dictionary of Synonymous Words in the English Languare

Charles John Smith - 1904 - 781 pages
...life, than a virtue in itself. " Thus leave Thee, native soil, these happy walks and shades, Fit hannt of gods? where I had hope to spend Quiet, though sad, the respite of that day That must be mortal to ns both." MILTON. SERENE (Lat. sirhtus) it used of the atmosphere, and denotes the union...
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Paradise Lost

John Milton - 1905 - 242 pages
...Thessaly famous for Ihc ostrtim, or purple-fish, there caught. t The Tyrian purple. Fit haunt of gods 7 where I had hope to spend, Quiet, though sad, the respite of that day That must be mortal to us both. O flowers, That never will in other climate grow, My early visitation, and my...
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Melody in Speech: A Book of Principle, Precept, and Practice in Inflection ...

Robert Raikes Raymond - 1906 - 180 pages
...arch Sparkle the crowd of stars, when day is done, Less brightly ? Must I thus leave thee, Paradise? thus leave Thee, native soil, these happy walks and shades, Fit haunt of gods? Heard ye those loud, contending waves, That shook Cecropia's pillared state ? Saw ye the mighty from...
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Complete Poetical Works

John Milton - 1908 - 554 pages
...! Must I thus leave thee Paradise? thus leave Thee Native Soile, these happie Walks and Shades, 770 Fit haunt of Gods? where I had hope to spend, Quiet though sad, the respit of that day That must be mortal to us both. O flours, That never will in other Climate grow,...
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