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" O unexpected stroke, worse than of death ! Must I thus leave thee, Paradise? thus leave Thee, native soil, these happy walks and shades, Fit haunt of gods? where I had hope to spend, Quiet though sad, the respite of that day That must be mortal to us... "
Paradise lost, a poem. With the life of the author [by E. Fenton]. - Page 253
by John Milton - 1800
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La Belle Assemblée, Volume 1

1806
...place of her retire. O unexpected stroke, worse than of death! Must I thus leave thee, Paradise? thns leave Thee, native soil, these happy walks and shades,...to spend, Quiet though sad, the respite of that day Thmt must be mortal to us both. O flowers, That never will in other climate grow, My early visitation,...
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The Spectator, Volume 6

Alexander Chalmers - 1810
...Must I then leave thee,' Paradise ? Thus leave Thee, native soil, these happy walks and shades, Jfit haunt of gods, where I had hope to spend Quiet, though sad, the respite of that day That must be mortal to us both ? O flowers, That never will in other climate grow, My early visitation, and my...
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Cowley, Denham, Milton

Alexander Chalmers - 1810
...place of her retire. " O unexpected stroke, worse than of Death J Must I thus leave thee, Paradise ? thus leave Thee, native soil ! these happy walks and shades. Fit haunt of gods ? where I had hope to spendj Quiet though sad, the respite of that da; That must be m--.rr.il to us both. O flowers, That...
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The Works of the Right Honourable Joseph Addison, Volume 4

Joseph Addison - 1811
...Paradise ? thus leave Thee, native soil, these happy walks and shades, L it haunt of gods ; where I bad hope to spend Quiet, though sad, the respite of that day That must be mortal to us both. O flow'r* That never will in other climate grow, My early visitation and my last...
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An Abridgement of Lectures on Rhetoric

Hugh Blair - 1813 - 276 pages
...eompelled to leave it. Oh, unexpeeted stroke, worse than of death ! Must I thus leave thee, Paradise > thus leave Thee, native soil ; these happy walks and...spend Quiet, though sad, the respite of that day, Whieh must be mortal to us both .' O flowers ! That never will in other elimate grow, My early visitation,...
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The Flowers of Modern History: Comprehending on a New Plan, the Most ...

John Adams - 1813 - 310 pages
...place of her retreat. " O unexpected stroke, worse than of death I " Must I thus leave thee, Paradise ? thus leave " Thee, native soil, these happy walks and shades, " Fit haunt of Gods ? where I had hoped to spend, " Quiet, though sad, the respite of that day ' That must be mortal to us both. O...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres

Hugh Blair - 1815 - 544 pages
...thus leave thee, Paradise! thus leave Thee, native coil, these happy walks, and shades, Fit liauir of gods ! where I had hope to spend Quiet, though sad, the respite of that day, U liich must be mortal to us both. O flowers! That never will in other climate grow, My early visitation...
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The Literary Panorama and National Register

1816
...emotions : unexpected stroke, worse llian of Heath! Must I thus leave thee Paradise ? thus leave Tbee, native soil, these happy walks and shades, Fit haunt of Gods? where I bad hope to spend, (i ii i though sad, the respite of that day That must lie mortal to us both. ...
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Paradise lost, a poem, Volume 2

John Milton - 1817
...place of her retire. O unexpected stroke, worse than of Death ! Must I thus leave thee, Paradise ? thus leave Thee, native soil ! these happy walks and...Quiet though sad, the respite of that day That must be mortal to us both. O flowers, That never will in other climate grow, My early visitation, and my...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres

Hugh Blair - 1817 - 500 pages
...compelled to leave it. Oh ! unexpected stroke, worse than of death ! Must 1 thus leave thee Paradise ' thus leave Thee, native soil, these happy walks, and shades, Fit haunt of gods ! where 1 had hope to spend Quiet, though sad, the respite of that day, Which must lie mortal to us both. ...
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