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" Alas, poor Yorick ! I knew him, Horatio : a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy : he hath borne me on his back a thousand times ; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! my gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed... "
The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare - Page 337
by William Shakespeare, William Harness - 1830
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Who's who in Shakespeare

Peter Quennell, Hamish Johnson - 2002 - 228 pages
...gravediggers unearth his skull as they prepare Ophelia's grave. This provokes his famous meditation : Alas poor Yorick! I knew him Horatio, a fellow of...roar? Not one now to mock your own grinning? Quite chop-fallen ? Now get you to my lady's chamber, and tell her, let her paint an inch thick, to this...
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Hamlet: The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke : the First Folio of 1623 ...

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 261 pages
...skull, was Yorick's skull - the King's jester.54 Hamlet This? 1 Clown E'en that. Hamlet Let me see. Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio, a fellow of...merriment that were wont to set the table on a roar? No one now to mock your own jeering? 55 Quite chop-fallen? Now get you to my lady's chamber and tell...
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Anthropology and Antihumanism in Imperial Germany

Andrew Zimmerman - 2010 - 372 pages
...borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! my gorge rims at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know...on a roar? Not one now, to mock your own grinning? -Hamlet, act 5, scene i What so dismayed Hamlet about Yorick's skull was precisely what made the skull...
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Deadly Thought: Hamlet and the Human Soul

Jan H. Blits - 2001 - 405 pages
...every god did seem to set his seal" (3.4.54, 55-56, 60-61). Yorick's skull sets the two forms at odds: Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not...roar? Not one now to mock your own grinning? Quite chop-fallen? (5.1.182-86) Not only is there no one now to mock the jester's grinning; the skull's grinning...
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Victorian Afterlives: The Shaping of Influence in Nineteenth-century Literature

Robert Douglas-Fairhurst, Professor of English Literature and Fellow of Magdalen College Oxford Robert Douglas-Fairhurst - 2002 - 372 pages
...poor Yorick. I knew him, Horatio, a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath bore me on his back a thousand times, and now how abhorred...roar? Not one now to mock your own grinning? Quite chop-fallen?197 338 Under the Influence Tennyson, in the 'chop-house': I kiss the lips I once have...
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Victorian Afterlives: The Shaping of Influence in Nineteenth-century Literature

Robert Douglas-Fairhurst - 2004 - 372 pages
...knew him. Horatio, a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath bore me on his hack a thousand times, and now how abhorred in my imagination...roar? Not one now to mock your own grinning? Quite chop-fallen?t97 '"'' H. Barton Baker, 'The Old Tavern Life', Gmtlemm 'i Magatine, 245 (t879l, 755....
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 35

Stanley Wells - 2002 - 224 pages
...of 'I knew him, Horatio: ... he hath borne me on his back a thousand times ', to direct address: ' Where be your gibes now, your gambols, your songs,...roar? Not one now to mock your own grinning - quite chap-fall'n? ' Jolted back into his fool's role, he thus addresses the fool's mirror-image in complete...
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Shakespeare Survey: An Annual Survey of Shakespeare Studies and ..., Volume 45

Peter Holland - 2005 - 367 pages
...excellent fancy. He hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred my imagination is! My gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that...roar? Not one now to mock your own grinning? Quite chop-fallen! Now get you to my lady's chamber and tell her, let her paint an inch thick, to this favour...
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The Yale Book of Quotations

Fred R. Shapiro, Associate Librarian and Lecturer in Legal Research Fred R Shapiro - 2006 - 1067 pages
...poor Yorick. I knew him, Horatio, a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath bore become 0 chop-fallen? Now get you to my lady's chamber and tell her, let her paint an inch thick, to this favor...
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Laughing and Weeping in Early Modern Theatres

Matthew Steggle - 2007 - 158 pages
...ability to induce them in others: Yorick the jester. Thus, in Act Five, Hamlet addresses Yorick's skull: Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs?...roar? Not one now, to mock your own grinning? quite chopfallen? Now get you to my lady's chamber and tell her, paint an inch thick, to this favor she must...
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