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" O, it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings... "
The Plays - Page 163
by William Shakespeare - 1824
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The Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1852
...town-crier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus ; but use all gently ; for in the very torrent, tempest, and (as I may say)...to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings;* who, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb show, and noise...
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The plays of Shakspere, carefully revised [by J.O.] with ..., Part 166, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1853
...air too much with your hand, thus ; but use all gently ; for in the very torrent, tempest, and ( I may say) whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire...to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings ; who, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows and noise...
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School elocution : or The young academical orator

William Herbert - 1853 - 192 pages
...town-crier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus ; but use all gently ; for in the very torrent, tempest, and (as I may say,)...O, it offends me to the soul, to hear a robustious perriwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings...
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The Life and Beauties of Shakespeare: Comprising Careful Selections from ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 345 pages
...much with your hand, thus: but use all gently: for in the very torrent, tempest, and (as I may sav) whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget...O, it offends me to the soul, to hear a robustious periwig-patcd fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to spli* the ears of the groundlings;...
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The Wisdom and Genius of Shakespeare: Comprising Moral Philosophy ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 575 pages
...moment, Consideration like an angel came, And whipp'd the offending Adam out of himb. 20 i. 1. 104. It offends me to the soul, to hear a robustious periwig-pated...to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings ; who, for the most part are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows, and noise...
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The Book of Eloquence: A Collection of Extracts in Prose and Verse, from the ...

1853 - 452 pages
...whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance, that may give it smoothness. 0, it offends me to the soul, to hear a robustious periwig-pated...to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings ; who, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows, and noise...
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The Standard Speaker: Containing Exercises in Prose and Poetry for ...

1854
...town-crier spoke my lines. Nor, do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus : but use all gently ; for, in the very torrent, tempest, and, as I may say,...tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the GROUNDLINGS; V\>, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable. dumlr show and noise....
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The Plays of William Shakspeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1854
...town-crier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus ; but use all gently; for in the very torrent, tempest, and (as I may say)...smoothness. O, it offends me to the soul, to hear a (1) Reprimand him with freedom. 282 HAMLET, Ad III. robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion...
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The Works of Shakespeare: the Text Carefully Restored According to the First ...

William Shakespeare - 1856
...while he is carrying on the plot." H. saw the air too much with your hand, thus ; but use all gently : for in the very torrent, tempest, and, as I may say,...to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings ; 2 who, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows, and noise...
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The Popular lecturer [afterw.] Pitman's Popular lecturer (and ..., Volumes 1-3

Henry Pitman - 1856
...town crier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus ; but use all gently, for in the very torrent, tempest, and (as I may say)...beget a temperance that may give it smoothness. O ! it offend me to the soul to hear a robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very...
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