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" O, it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings... "
The Plays - Page 163
by William Shakespeare - 1824
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Principles of Elocution: Containing Numerous Rules, Observations, and ...

Thomas Ewing - 1832
...whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance that may give it smoothness. Oh ! it offends me to the soul, to hear a robustious periwig-pated...to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings ; who (for the most part) are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb-show and noise....
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Analysis of the Principles of Rhetorical Delivery as Applied in Reading and ...

Ebenezer Porter - 1833 - 404 pages
...lines. Nor do not saw the air too much with your 5 hand, thus: but use all gently : for in the yery torrent, tempest, and (as I may say) whirlwind of...robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tat10 ters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings; who, for the most part, are capable...
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The English Orator: a Selection of Pieces for Reading & Recitation

James Hedderwick - 1833 - 216 pages
...whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance, that may give it smoothness. Oh, it offends me to the soul, to hear a robustious periwig-pated...to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings; who, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb show and noise. Pray...
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King Lear. Romeo and Juliet. Hamlet. Othello

William Shakespeare - 1836
...towncrier spoke my lines.2 Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus ; but use all gently ; for in the very torrent, tempest, and (as I may say)...to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings ; 3 who, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows, and 1 See...
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Select plays from Shakspeare; adapted for the use of schools and young ...

William Shakespeare - 1836
...town-crier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus ; but use all gently : for in the very torrent, tempest, and (as I may say)...O, it offends me to the soul, to hear a robustious periwig-pated2 fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings...
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The poet's daughter

Poet - 1837
...CHAPTER VIII. ^^ Nor do not saw the air too much with your han>i, thus ; but use all gently : for in the very torrent, tempest, and (as I may say;...O, it offends me to the soul, to hear a robustious, perriwigpated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags : to split the ears of the groundlings...
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Principles of elocution

William Graham (teacher of elocution.) - 1837
...whirlwind of your passions, you must acquire and beget a temperance that may give it smoothness. 0, it offends me to the soul, to hear a robustious periwig-pated...to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings ; who, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb show and noise....
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The Works of Shakespere, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1843
...air too much with your hand, thus ; but use all gently ; for in the very torrent, tempest, and (as 1 may say) whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire...to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings ; who, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows and noise...
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The works of Shakspere, revised from the best authorities: with a ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1843
...whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance that may give it smoothness. Oi it offends me to the soul, to hear a robustious periwig-pated...to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings ; who, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows and noise...
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The universal class-book: a ser. of reading lessons

Samuel Maunder - 1844
...town-crier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus; but use all gently: for in the very torrent, tempest, and (as I may say)...to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings; who, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows and noise:...
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