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" Behold, I have a weapon ; A better never did itself sustain Upon a soldier's thigh : I have seen the day, That, with this little arm and this good sword, I have made my way through more impediments Than twenty times your stop : but, O vain boast ! Who... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and Illustrations of ... - Page 412
by William Shakespeare - 1809
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The Heroic Idiom of Shakespearean Tragedy

James C. Bulman - 1985 - 254 pages
...elegiacally, in the manner of Othello's noble ubi sunt. "I have seen the day," Othello reminisces, "That, with this little arm and this good sword, /...more impediments / Than twenty times your stop." But Antony's civic memories are tucked self-consciously into a subordinate clause: I, that with my sword...
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Elizabethan Stage Conventions and Modern Interpreters

Alan C. Dessen - 1984 - 204 pages
...better never did itself sustain / Upon a soldier's thigh') in a speech that stresses his heroic past: 'I have seen the day / That with this little arm and...more impediments / Than twenty times your stop.' But, he concludes "Tis not so now. / Be not afraid, though you do see me weaponed'; rather, 'man but a rush...
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Othello

William Shakespeare - 2012
...matter? 262 OTHELLO Behold, I have a weapon; A better never did itself sustain Upon a soldier's thigh: I have seen the day That with this little arm and...boast! Who can control his fate? 'tis not so now. 269 Be not afraid, though you do see me weaponed: 270 Here is my journey's end. here is my butt* 271...
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Shakespearean Tragedy and Its Double: The Rhythms of Audience Response

Kent Cartwright - 2010
...his collapse of valor in "Behold, I have a weapon" (259-82). "Be not afraid," he says to Grariano, "Here is my journey's end, here is my butt / And very sea-mark of my utmost sail" (266-68). Destination, target, and peninsula: They are the bed, whose sight (recollections of his arrival...
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Othello

William Shakespeare - 1992 - 172 pages
...matter? OTHELLO Behold, I have a weapon: A better never did itself sustain 260 Upon a soldier's thigh. I have seen the day That with this little arm and...'tis not so now. Be not afraid, though you do see me weaponed: Here is my journey's end, here is my butt And very sea-mark of my utmost sail. Do you go...
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Shakespeare at Work

John Jones - 1999 - 292 pages
...through the closing minutes, and first asserted now: Be not afraid, though you do see me weaponed. Here is my journey's end, here is my butt And very sea-mark of my utmost sail. Do you go back dismayed? 'Tis a lost fear. Man but a rush against Othello's breast And he retires. Where should Othello...
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Otello. Testo originale a fronte

William Shakespeare - 1996 - 301 pages
...matter ? OTHELLO Behold, I have a weapon: A better never did itself sustain Upon a soldier's thigh. I have seen the day That with this little arm and...impediments Than twenty times your stop. But, O vain boast I Who can control his fate ? - Tis not so now. Be not afraid, though you do see me weaponcd: Here is...
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Beyond Representation: Philosophy and Poetic Imagination

Charles and Harriett Cox McDowell Professor of Philosophy Richard Eldridge - 1996 - 306 pages
...articulate in its power to generate a selfdisgust so deep that any other torture would be a relief: Here is my journey's end, here is my butt And very sea-mark of my utmost sail. Do you go back dismay'd? Tis a lost fear Man but a rush against Othello's breast And he retires. Where should Othello...
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Shakespeare's Political Pageant: Essays in Literature and Politics

Joseph Alulis, Vickie B. Sullivan - 1996 - 276 pages
...the moment he realizes his dead wife's innocence, that there is always "a world elsewhere"27 for him. Here is my journey's end, here is my butt And very sea-mark of my utmost sail. Do you go back dismay'd? Tis a lost fear; Man but a rush against Othello's breast And he retires. Where should Othello...
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Shakespeare in Opera, Ballet, Orchestral Music, and Song: An Introduction to ...

Arthur Graham - 1997 - 213 pages
...escape. Othello: Behold, I have a weapon, A better never did itself sustain Upon a soldier's thigh: I have seen the day, That with this little arm, and...And very sea-mark of my utmost sail. Do you go back dismay'd? 'tis a lost fear: Man but a rush against Othello's breast, And he retires. Where should Othello...
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