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" Behold, I have a weapon ; A better never did itself sustain Upon a soldier's thigh : I have seen the day, That, with this little arm and this good sword, I have made my way through more impediments Than twenty times your stop : but, O vain boast ! Who... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and Illustrations of ... - Page 412
by William Shakespeare - 1809
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Dictionary of Shakespearian Quotations: Exhibiting the Most Forcible ...

William Shakespeare - 1851 - 418 pages
...M >.-- , TIME, MIGHTY DEAD, LIFE, SOLDIER'S DEATH). The blind cave of eternal night. R. III. v. 3. Here is my journey's end ; here is my butt, And very sea-mark of my utmost sail. O. v. 2. O ruin'd piece of nature ! this great world Shall so wear out to nought. A". /.. iv. G. Nay,...
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The Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1852
...matter ? Oik. Behold, I have a weapon ; A better never did itself sustain Upon a soldier's thigh : I have seen the day, That, with this little arm, and...afraid, though you do see me weapon'd ; Here is my journey s end, here is my butt, And very sea-mark of my utmost sail. Do you go back dismay'd ? 'tis...
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Shakspeare and His Times

François Guizot - 1852 - 424 pages
...through more impediments Than twenty times your stop. But 0, vain boast ! Who can control his &te ? Tis not so now. Be not afraid though you do see me...And very sea-mark of my utmost sail. Do you go back dismayed) 'Tis a lost fear : Make but a rush against Othello's breast, And he retires." Then he falls...
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Dramatic Works: From the Text of Johnson, Stevens and Reed; with ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1852
...day, Tnat, with this little arm, and this good sword, 1 have made my way through more impediments Thau twenty times your stop : But, O vain boast ! "Who...afraid, though you do see me weapon'd ; Here is my journey s end, here is my butt, And very sea-mark of my utmost sail. Do you go back dismay'd ? 'tis...
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Shakspeare and His Times

Guizot (M., François) - 1852 - 360 pages
...adds, and this relieves him, " But why should honor outlive honesty ? Let it go, all." And then, " I have seen the day, That, with this little arm and...more impediments Than twenty times your stop. But 0, vain boast ! Who can control his fate ? 'Tis not so now. Be not afraid though you do see me weapon'd....
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Shakespeare et son temps: étude littéraire

François Guizot - 1852 - 428 pages
...fuir, Où irait Othello maintenant? I have seen the day That, w li il ii this littlc arm and lhis good sword, I have made my way through more impediments...twenty times your stop. But, o vain boast ! Who can coutrol his fate ? 'tis not so now. Be not afraid, though you do see nie weapon'd ; Here is my journey's...
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St. George; Or, The Canadian League, Volume 2

William Charles McKinnon - 1852
...the front street, where De Waterville awaited his return. CHAPTER XLIX. THE SCIENCE OF VENGEANCE. " Here is my journey's end, here is my butt And very sea-mark of my utmost sail." * ***** " Of one that loved not wisely, but too well Of one not easily jealous, but being wrought,...
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The Life and Beauties of Shakespeare: Comprising Careful Selections from ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 345 pages
...it. HIS REMORSE. Behold! I have a weapon; A better never did itself sustain Upon a soldier's thigh: I have seen the day, That, with this little arm, and this good sword, I have made my way through more impediment!. Than twenty times your stop: But, O vain boait' Who can control his fate? 'tis not...
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The plays of Shakspere, carefully revised [by J.O.] with ..., Part 167, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1853
...bonst ! Who can control his fate ? is not so now. Be not afraid, though you do see me weaponed dismayed ? 't is a lost fear : Man but a rush against Othello's breast, And he retires : where...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1854
...soldier's thigh : I have seen the day, (1) Steel is hardened by being put red-hot into very cold water. That, with this little arm, and this good sword, I have made my way through more impedimenta Than twenty times your stop : But, O vain boast '. Who can control his fate ? 'tis...
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