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" I go, and it is done: the bell invites me. Hear it not, Duncan, for it is a knell That summons thee to heaven, or to hell. "
The Plays of William Shakespeare in Ten Volumes: With Corrections and ... - Page 498
by William Shakespeare - 1778
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Scenes and Stages

John O'Connor - 2001 - 245 pages
...whereabout, And take the present horror from the time, Which now suits with it. Whiles I threat, he lives: 30 Words to the heat of deeds too cold breath gives. A bell rings. Mine eyes are made the fools . . . cither my eyes are stupid compared to the rest of my senses, or...
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Social Cognition Through Drama and Literature for People with Learning ...

Nicola Grove, Keith Park - 2001 - 109 pages
...take the present horror from the time Which now suits with it. I go and it is done. (a bell rings) The bell invites me. Hear it not, Duncan, for it is a knell Which summons thee to heaven or to hell. Feel bubble FRIGHTENED. QUESTIONS EARLY SKILLS LATER SKILLS...
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The Time is Out of Joint: Shakespeare as Philosopher of History

Agnes Heller - 2002 - 375 pages
...since he follows the dagger, he must do the deed. Listen to Macbeth: "Whiles I threat, he lives. / Words to the heat of deeds too cold breath gives,...me. / Hear it not, Duncan: for it is a knell / That summons thee to heaven, or to hell" (2.1.60-64). But at the very moment that he murders, he already...
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Mayflower Bastard: A Stranger Among the Pilgrims

David Lindsay - 2004 - 262 pages
...trebling, spinning out of control . . . the wages of a lust for land, paid by a man who had chosen the sea. I go, and it is done. The bell invites me. Hear it not, Duncan, for it is a knell That summons thee to heaven, or to hell. óMacbeth, II: 1 UNDERSTANDABLY, a relative quiet descended on...
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Macbeth

William Shakespeare - 2003 - 137 pages
...whereabout. And take the present horror from the time, Which now suits with it. Whiles I threat, he lives; 60 Words to the heat of deeds too cold breath gives....invites me. Hear it not, Duncan, for it is a knell That summons thee to heaven, or to hell. [Exit PgJ Lady Macbeth waits nervously for her husband to murder...
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Re-visions of Shakespeare: Essays in Honor of Robert Ornstein

Robert Ornstein, Evelyn Gajowski - 2004 - 298 pages
...whereabouts, And take the present horror from the time, Which now suits with it. Whiles I threat, he lives: Words to the heat of deeds too cold breath gives....invites me. Hear it not, Duncan, for it is a knell, That summons thee to heaven, or to hell. Act 2, Scene 1 Enter Banquo, and Fleance, with a torch before him....
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The Films of Orson Welles

Robert Garis - 2004 - 184 pages
...whereabout, And take the present horror from the time, Which now suits with it. Whiles I threat, he lives: Words to the heat of deeds too cold breath gives....invites me. Hear it not, Duncan, for it is a knell, That summons thee to heaven, or to hell. That hallucination doesn't in the end shake his will to proceed...
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The Great Comedies and Tragedies

William Shakespeare - 2005 - 896 pages
...whereabout, And take the present horror from the time, Which now suits with it. Whiles I threat, he lives: 60 Words to the heat of deeds too cold breath gives....invites me. Hear it not, Duncan, for it is a knell That summons thee to heaven, or to hell. [he steals out by the open door at back, and step by step climbs...
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The Practical Shakespeare: The Plays in Practice and on the Page

Colin Butler - 2005 - 205 pages
...murderous intent, but at the same time exuding reluctance, craven obedience, and an acute sense of guilt:"I go, and it is done; the bell invites me. / Hear it not, Duncan, for it is a knell, / That summons thee to heaven or to hell." Macbeth 's exit shows him to be human in both senses of the word....
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Shakespeare and Cognition: Aristotle's Legacy and Shakespearean Drama

Arthur F. Kinney - 2006 - 167 pages
...whereabout, And take the present horror from the time, Which now suits with it. Whiles I threat, he lives: Words to the heat of deeds too cold breath gives....invites me. Hear it not, Duncan, for it is a knell, That summons thee to heaven or to hell (2.1.33-64). Even for Shakespeare, this soliloquy is remarkable....
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