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" The weight of this sad time we must obey ; Speak what we feel, not what we ought to say. The oldest hath borne most : we, that are young, Shall never see so much, nor live so long. "
The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: King Lear. Romeo and Juliet ... - Page 133
by William Shakespeare - 1851 - 38 pages
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Lawyers, Law, and Social Change

Steve Bachmann - 2001 - 220 pages
...lead him to investigate further the historical, theoretical, and political implications of Huey Long. The weight of this sad time we must obey; Speak what...oldest hath borne most: we that are young Shall never so see much, nor live so long.97 William Shakespeare 92 For example, there is no record that Huey...
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Shakespeare Survey: Volume 55, King Lear and Its Afterlife: An Annual Survey ...

Peter Holland - 2002 - 410 pages
...form might that future action take? Fittingly of course Lear remains equivocal to the last: EDGAR : The weight of this sad time we must obey, Speak what...see so much, nor live so long. Exeunt with a dead mardi. (5.3. 322-5) In the closing lines of the play 'feeling' and 'speaking', rather than feeling...
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Moving Voices: Black Performance Poetry

Asher Hoyles, Martin Hoyles - 2002 - 231 pages
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Novel Shakespeares: Twentieth-century Women Novelists and Appropriation

Julie Sanders - 2001 - 258 pages
...Daddy. (370) In many ways the tone echoes the melancholic resignation of Edgar at the end of Lear: The weight of this sad time we must obey; Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. (5.3.322-5) The real clue may lie in the expression or declaration 'Speak what we feel, not what we...
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Stages and Playgoers: From Guild Plays to Shakespeare

Janet Hill - 2002 - 241 pages
...in private grief, Kent cannot help (5.3.320-1). Edgar is perhaps left alone to speak the epilogue: The weight of this sad time we must obey, Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. (5.3.324-7) But his words are inadequate. I agree with Peter Brook's assessment of them as "trite,"...
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Constructing Mark Twain: New Directions in Scholarship

Michael J. Kiskis, Laura E. Skandera-Trombley - 2001 - 252 pages
...sustain. KENT: I have a journey, Sir, shortly to go; My master calls me, 1 must not say no. EDGAR: The weight of this sad time we must obey; Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. T& htt preferred friend* he revealed fM true character* Mary Mason Fairbanks's Disguised Debate with...
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The Time is Out of Joint: Shakespeare as Philosopher of History

Agnes Heller - 2002 - 375 pages
...realm (because Kent, the loyal squire, will follow his master, the dead King Lear into his grave): "The weight of this sad time we must obey, / Speak...young / Shall never see so much, nor live so long" (King Lear Quarto 5.3.318-21). King Lear ends in utter resignation. For one should not forget: these...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 33

Kenneth Muir - 2002 - 236 pages
...uncertainty: Kent. I have a journey, sir, shortly to go; My master calls me, I must not say no. Edgar. The weight of this sad time we must obey; Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. (v, iii, 321-6) There is no emphasis on the restoration of order and no expressed hope in the future....
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Speaking Shakespeare

Patsy Rodenburg - 2002 - 355 pages
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History of European Drama and Theatre

Erika Fischer-Lichte - 2002 - 396 pages
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