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" The weight of this sad time we must obey ; Speak what we feel, not what we ought to say. The oldest hath borne most : we, that are young, Shall never see so much, nor live so long. "
The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: King Lear. Romeo and Juliet ... - Page 133
by William Shakespeare - 1851 - 38 pages
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Nature and the Crisis of Modernity: A Critique of Contemporary Discourse on ...

Raymond Albert Rogers - 1994 - 187 pages
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Textual Practice: Volume 8, Issue 3

Terence Hawkes, Jean Howard - 1994 - 160 pages
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An Introduction to Literature, Criticism, and Theory: Key Critical Concepts

Andrew Bennett, Nicholas Royle - 1995 - 238 pages
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Dramatic Closure: Reading the End

June Schlueter - 1995 - 144 pages
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Selected Poems

William Shakespeare - 1995 - 128 pages
...undo this button. Thank you, sir. Do you see this? Look on her! Look her lips, Look there, look there The weight of this sad time we must obey, Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. 65 The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements. Come,...
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The Western Canon: The Books and School of the Ages

Harold Bloom - 1995 - 546 pages
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Shakespeare's Universal Wolf: Studies in Early Modern Reification

Hugh Grady, Professor of English Hugh Grady - 1996 - 270 pages
...such, it is fitting that he defines the last, after-the-deluge sombre mood with which the play ends:6 6 The weight of this sad time we must obey. Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. {v. iii. 324-7) We can detect in the first couplet a suggestion of a refusal to revert back to the...
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The Origins of Free Verse

Associate Professor H T Kirby-Smith, A.B., M.A., Henry Tompkins Kirby-Smith - 1996 - 304 pages
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Shakespeare the Playwright: A Companion to the Complete Tragedies, Histories ...

Victor L. Cahn - 1996 - 865 pages
...iii, 322-323) He anticipates joining Lear in death. Edgar then prepares to move the kingdom forward: The weight of this sad time we must obey. Speak what...are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long. (V, iii, 324-327) Edgar seems to feel that Lear's life has taught others who will follow, and this...
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The Company of Knaves: A Philip Fletcher Mystery

Simon Shaw - 1997 - 224 pages
...opinions had usually been right. He had possessed a fund of sense and had been good company personified. The weight of this sad time we must obey; Speak what...young, Shall never see so much, nor live so long. Philip stood alone in his living room, thinking lines of remembrance, while Verdi's Requiem issued...
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