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" The supreme power cannot take from any man any part of his property without his own consent. For the preservation of property being the end of government, and that for which men enter into society, it necessarily supposes and requires that the people... "
The Gentleman's and London Magazine: Or Monthly Chronologer, 1741-1794 - Page 73
1741
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The Unvarnished Doctrine: Locke, Liberalism, and the American Revolution

Steven M. Dworetz - 1994 - 247 pages
...or their deputies." Locke recognized the need for taxation in civil society. But "the preservation of property being the end of government, and that for which men enter into society,"76 consent constitutes an indispensable condition for legitimacy in the transfer of property...
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Private Property Rights and Environmental Laws: Hearings Before the ...

United States, United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Environment and Public Works - 1996 - 235 pages
...Power cannot take from any Man any Part of his Property without his own consent. For the preservation of Property being the end. of Government, and that for which Men enter into Society, it necessarily supposes and requires, that the People should have Property.") Ibid. 6"[N]or...
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Modern Political Thought: Readings from Machiavelli to Nietzsche

David Wootton - 1996 - 946 pages
...supreme power cannot take from any man part of his property without his own consent. For the preservation ality and violence of men. I easily grant, that civil government is the pr society, it necessarily supposes and requires, that the people should have property, without which...
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Beyond Contractual Morality: Ethics, Law, and Literature in Eighteenth ...

Julia Simon - 2001 - 233 pages
...supreme power cannot take from any man part of his property without his consent; for the preservation of property being the end of government and that for which men enter into society, it necessarily supposes and requires that the people should have property; without which they...
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Governmental Illegitimacy in International Law

Brad R. Roth - 2000 - 439 pages
...supreme power cannot take from any man any part of his property without his consent. For the preservation of property being the end of government, and that for which men enter into [political] society, it necessarily supposes and requires that the people should have property, without...
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Reclaiming Indigenous Voice and Vision

Marie Battiste - 2011 - 314 pages
...into political society, which was set up specifically to protect these rights: "For the preservation of Property being the end of Government, and that for which Men enter into society, it necessarily supposes and requires, that the People should have Property, without which...
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City Making: Building Communities without Building Walls

Gerald E. Frug - 2001 - 272 pages
...power cannot take from any man any part of his property without his own consent. For the preservation of property being the end of government, and that for which men enter into society, it necessarily supposes and requires that the people should have property, without which they...
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Hamilton Unbound: Finance and the Creation of the American Republic

Robert Eric Wright - 2002 - 230 pages
...supreme power cannot take from any man part of his property without his own consent; for the preservation of property being the end of government and that for which men enter into society, it necessarily supposes and requires that the people should have property.179 At a meeting...
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Locke, Jefferson, and the Justices: Foundations and Failures of the US ...

George M. Stephens - 2007 - 224 pages
...legislative) cannot take from any man any part of his property without his consent (the preservation of property being the end of government and that for which men enter into society) He noted that for the protection of government everyone should pay his share, but only with...
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Locke: Political Writings

John Locke, David Wootton - 2003 - 478 pages
...power cannot take from any man any part of his property without his own consent. For the preservation of property being the end of government, and that for which men enter into society, it necessarily supposes and requires that the people should have property, without which they...
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