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" I have of late — but wherefore I know not — lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the... "
The Works of William Shakespeare - Page 506
by William Shakespeare - 1857
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Choice thoughts from Shakspere, by the author of 'The book of familiar ...

William Shakespeare - 1861
...discretion. Reflections on Man. I have of late (but wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises : and, indeed, it goes so...canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'er-hanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire, why, it appears no other thing to me, than...
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The Shakespeare's cyclopædia; or, A classified and elucidated summary of ...

James Hamilton Fennell - 1862
...nature, and aware that no composition of their own could possibly convey the same idea so well. "HAMLET. I have of late, (but, wherefore, I know not,) lost...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a steril* promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
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Chamber's household edition of the dramatic works of William ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1862
...and queen moult no feather. I have of late (but, wherefore, I know not) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises : and, indeed, it goes so...canopy, the air, look you — this brave o'erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire — why, it appears no other thing to me than...
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Shakespeare's plays, abridged and revised for the use of girls by R. Baughan ...

William Shakespeare - 1863
...and count myself a king of infinite space: were it not that I have had dreams. I have of late (hut wherefore, I know not) lost all my mirth, forgone...canopy, the air, look you. — this brave o'erhanging — this majestical roof fretted with golden fire, why, it appears no other thing to me than a foul...
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The Scottish Review: A Quarterly Journal of Social Progress and ..., Volume 1

1853
...well-known soliloquy : ' I have of late — but wherefore I know not — lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so...canopy, the air, look you, — this brave o'erhanging firmament, this majestic roof, fretted with golden fire, — why, it appears no other thing to me than...
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A Study of Hamlet

John Conolly - 1863 - 209 pages
...queen. Moult 110 feather. I have of late (but, wherefore, I know not,) lost .all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so...canopy, the air, look you, — this brave o'erhanging firmament — this majestical roof fretted with golden fire — why, it appears no other thing to mo...
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The British Controversialist and Literary Magazine, Volume 2

1863
...is Shakspere's prose : — " I have of la'e (but wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises, and indeed it goes so heavily...canopy — the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fires — why, it appeareth no other thing, to...
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Foliorum silvula, selections for translation into Latin and Greek ..., Volume 2

Hubert Ashton Holden - 1864
...have saved? Ah, what a shame ! ah, what a fault were this ! W. SHAKESPEARE I 407 HAMLETS MELANCHOLY HAVE of late — but wherefore I know not— lost...canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire, — why, it appears no other thing to me...
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Tragedies

William Shakespeare - 1864
...lord, we were sent for. Ham. I will tell you why ; so shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secrecy to the King and Queen moult no feather....disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a steril promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
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The Shakspearian Reader: A Collection of the Most Approved Plays of ...

William Shakespeare, John William Stanhope Hows - 1864 - 447 pages
...lord, we were sent for. Ham. I will tell you why ; so shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secrecy to the king and queen moult no feather....disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a steril promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
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