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" This idea, though weak and disguised, suffices to diminish the pain which we suffer from the misfortunes of those whom we love, and to reduce that affliction to such a pitch as converts it into a pleasure. "
The Monthly Mirror: Reflecting Men and Manners; with Strictures on Their ... - Page 407
1802
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A Philosophical Inquiry Into the Source of the Pleasures Derived from Tragic ...

Martin M'Dermot - 1824 - 405 pages
...to reduce that affliction to such a pitch, as converts it into pleasure. We weep for the misfortunes of a hero to whom we are attached. In the same instant,...ourselves by reflecting, that it is nothing but a fiction, and it is precisely that mixture of agreeable sorrow and tears that delight us. But, as that...
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Essays, moral, political, and literary

David Hume - 1825
...suffer from the misfortunes of • • those whom we love, and to reduce that affliction to suck " a pitch as converts it into a pleasure. We weep for...ourselves, by reflecting, that it ** is nothing but a fiction : And it is precisely that mix* • Reflection» snr la Poctiquc. § 36, " ture of sentiments,...
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Essays, moral, political, and literary

David Hume - 1825
...ancldisguised, suffices to dimi" nish the pain which we suffer from the misfortunes of " those whom we love, and to reduce that affliction to such " a...misfortune of a hero, to whom we are attached. In thd " same instant we comfort ourselves, by reflecting, that it " is nothing but a fiction : And it...
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Essays, moral, political, and literary

David Hume - 1842
...and disguised, suffices to ili(t minish the pain which we suffer from the misfortunes of " those whom we love, and to reduce that affliction to such " a pitch as converts it into a pleasure. We weep'for the " misfortune of a hero, to whom we are attached. In the f<tsame instant we comfort ourselves,...
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The Philosophical Works of David Hume ...

1826
...weak and disguised, suffices to diminish the pain which we suffer from the misfortunes of those whom we love, and to reduce that affliction to such a pitch...ourselves by reflecting, that it is nothing but a fiction : And it is precisely that mixture of sentiments which composes an agreeable sorrow, and tears...
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Beauty; Illustrated Chiefly by an Analysis and Classification of Beauty in ...

Alexander Walker - 1836 - 395 pages
...We have still a certain idea of falsehood in the whole of what we see. We weep for the misfortunes of a hero to whom we are attached. In the same instant,...ourselves by reflecting, that it is nothing but a fiction. The short answer to this is, that we are conscious of no such alternation as that here described....
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Beauty; Illustrated Chiefly by an Analysis and Classification of Beauty in Woman

Alexander Walker - 1840 - 390 pages
...We have still a certain idea of falsehood in the whole of what we see. We weep for the misfortunes of a hero to whom we are attached. In the same instant,...ourselves by reflecting, that it is nothing but a fiction. The short answer to this is, that we are conscious of no such alternation as that here described....
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The Works of George Campbell: Philosophy of rhetoric

George Campbell - 1840
...weak and disguised, suffices to diminish the pain which we suffer from the misfortunes of those whom we love, and to reduce that affliction to such a pitch as converts it into a pleasure. We weep for the misfortunes of a hero to whom we are attached. In the same instant we comfort ourselves by reflecting...
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Beauty: Illustrated Chiefly by an Analysis and Classification of Beauty in Woman

1845 - 390 pages
...We have still a certain idea of falsehood in the whole of what we see. We weep for the misfortunes of a hero to whom we are attached. In the same instant, we comfort ourselves hy reflecting, that it is nothing hut a fiction. The short answer to this is, that we are conscious...
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The Philosophy of Rhetoric

George Campbell - 1849 - 455 pages
...those whom we love, and to reduce that * Essay on Tragedy. t Reflexions sur la PoMique, sect, xxxvi. affliction to such a pitch as converts it into a pleasure. We weep for the misfortunes of a hero to whom we are attached. In the same instant we comfort ourselves by reflecting...
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