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" This idea, though weak and disguised, suffices to diminish the pain which we suffer from the misfortunes of those whom we love, and to reduce that affliction to such a pitch as converts it into a pleasure. "
The Monthly Mirror: Reflecting Men and Manners : with Strictures on Their ... - Page 405
1802
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A Philosophical Inquiry Into the Source of the Pleasures Derived from Tragic ...

Martin M'Dermot - 1824 - 405 pages
...to reduce that affliction to such a pitch, as converts it into pleasure. We weep for the misfortunes of a hero to whom we are attached. In the same instant,...ourselves by reflecting, that it is nothing but a fiction, and it is precisely that mixture of agreeable sorrow and tears that delight us. But, as that...
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Essays, moral, political, and literary

David Hume - 1825
...suffer from the misfortunes of • • those whom we love, and to reduce that affliction to suck " a pitch as converts it into a pleasure. We weep for...ourselves, by reflecting, that it ** is nothing but a fiction : And it is precisely that mix* • Reflection» snr la Poctiquc. § 36, " ture of sentiments,...
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Essays, moral, political, and literary

David Hume - 1825
...ancldisguised, suffices to dimi" nish the pain which we suffer from the misfortunes of " those whom we love, and to reduce that affliction to such " a...misfortune of a hero, to whom we are attached. In thd " same instant we comfort ourselves, by reflecting, that it " is nothing but a fiction : And it...
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Essays, moral, political, and literary

David Hume - 1842
...and disguised, suffices to ili(t minish the pain which we suffer from the misfortunes of " those whom we love, and to reduce that affliction to such " a pitch as converts it into a pleasure. We weep'for the " misfortune of a hero, to whom we are attached. In the f<tsame instant we comfort ourselves,...
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The Philosophical Works of David Hume ...

David Hume - 1826
...weak and disguised, suffices to diminish the pain which we suffer from the misfortunes of those whom we love, and to reduce that affliction to such a pitch...ourselves by reflecting, that it is nothing but a fiction : And it is precisely that mixture of sentiments which composes an agreeable sorrow, and tears...
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Beauty; Illustrated Chiefly by an Analysis and Classification of Beauty in ...

Alexander Walker - 1836 - 395 pages
...We have still a certain idea of falsehood in the whole of what we see. We weep for the misfortunes of a hero to whom we are attached. In the same instant,...ourselves by reflecting, that it is nothing but a fiction. The short answer to this is, that we are conscious of no such alternation as that here described....
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Beauty; Illustrated Chiefly by an Analysis and Classification of Beauty in Woman

Alexander Walker - 1840 - 390 pages
...We have still a certain idea of falsehood in the whole of what we see. We weep for the misfortunes of a hero to whom we are attached. In the same instant,...ourselves by reflecting, that it is nothing but a fiction. The short answer to this is, that we are conscious of no such alternation as that here described....
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The Works of George Campbell: Philosophy of rhetoric

George Campbell - 1840
...weak and disguised, suffices to diminish the pain which we suffer from the misfortunes of those whom we love, and to reduce that affliction to such a pitch as converts it into a pleasure. We weep for the misfortunes of a hero to whom we are attached. In the same instant we comfort ourselves by reflecting...
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Beauty: Illustrated Chiefly by an Analysis and Classification of Beauty in Woman

Alexander Walker - 1845 - 390 pages
...We have still a certain idea of falsehood in the whole of what we see. We weep for the misfortunes of a hero to whom we are attached. In the same instant, we comfort ourselves hy reflecting, that it is nothing hut a fiction. The short answer to this is, that we are conscious...
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The Philosophy of Rhetoric

George Campbell - 1849 - 455 pages
...those whom we love, and to reduce that * Essay on Tragedy. t Reflexions sur la PoMique, sect, xxxvi. affliction to such a pitch as converts it into a pleasure. We weep for the misfortunes of a hero to whom we are attached. In the same instant we comfort ourselves by reflecting...
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