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" O, it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings, who, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumbshows and noise : I would have such... "
The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare - Page 283
by William Shakespeare, William Harness - 1830
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The dramatic (poetical) works of William Shakspeare; illustr ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1851
...tongue; but if you mouth it, as many of our players do, I had as lief the towncrier spoke my lines.2 Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus...to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings ; 3 who, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows, and 1 See note on Act...
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THE DRAMATIC WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE; ILLISTRATED: EMBRACING A LIFE OF ...

1851
...tongue; but if you mouth it, as many of our players do, I had as lief the towncrier spoke my lines.2 Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus...to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings ; 3 who, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows, and 1 See note on Act...
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The speaker: or, Miscellaneous pieces selected from the best English writers ...

William Enfield, James Pycroft - 1851
...But if you mouth it, as many of our players do, I had as lief the town crier had spoke my lines. And do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus :...smoothness. O ! it offends me to the soul, to hear a robustuous perriwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare...: Embracing a Life of ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1851
...tongue ; but if you mouth it, as many of our players do, I had as lief the towncrier spoke my lines.9 Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus...give it smoothness. O, it offends me to the soul, to hoar a robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of...
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School elocution : or The young academical orator

William Herbert - 1853 - 192 pages
...praoocr,»c :: w yoa. f>r-:yrly on the but if yo« Moudi «. as maay of oar pixyos "do, I had as "Bef the town-crier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the...O, it offends me to the soul, to hear a robustious perriwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings...
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The Standard Speaker: Containing Exercises in Prose and Poetry for ...

1854
...THE PLAYERS. — Shaksptare. SPEAK the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to yon, trippingly on the tongue ; but, if you mouth it, as many of our...very rags, — to split the ears of the GROUNDLINGS; V\>, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable. dumlr show and noise. I would have...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1854
...unwatch'd go. [Exeunt. SCENE II. — 1 hall in the same. Enter Hamlet, and certain Flayers. ffam. Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you,...smoothness. O, it offends me to the soul, to hear a (1) Reprimand him with freedom. 282 HAMLET, Ad III. robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion...
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The Works of Shakespeare: the Text Carefully Restored According to the First ...

William Shakespeare - 1856
...happiest instances of Shakespeare's power of diversifying the scene while he is carrying on the plot." H. saw the air too much with your hand, thus ; but use...to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings ; 2 who, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows, and noise : I would...
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The philosophy of William Shakespeare delineating in seven hundred and fifty ...

William Shakespeare - 1857
...not unluckily against the bias. — TAMING OF THE SHREW, A. 4, S. 5. THE STAGE NATURE'S MIRROR, SPEAK the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you,...to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the ignorant ; who, for the most part are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows, and noise: I...
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The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1857
...the very torrent, tempest, and, as I may say, the whirlwind of passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance that may give it smoothness. O, it offends...most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb-shows and noise : I could have such a fellow whipped for o'erdoing Termagant ; it out-herods Herod...
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