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" Tis now the very witching time of night, When churchyards yawn, and hell itself breathes out Contagion to this world : now could I drink hot blood, And do such bitter business as the day Would quake to look on. "
Cumberland's British Theatre: With Remarks, Biographical and Critical ... - Page 47
1826
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Essays and Marginalia, Volume 1

Hartley Coleridge - 1851
...screwing up his spirits for the interview with his mother, not only is, but confesses himself maddened. " Now could I drink hot blood, And do such business as the bitter day Would quake to look on."' He even contemplates, while he deprecates, the possibility of his " heart losing its nature." Just...
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The Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1852
...so. [Exit POLONIUS. Ham. By and by is easily said. Leave me, friends. [Exeunt Eos. Gun. HOE. $c. "Tis now the very witching time of night ; When churchyards...mother, 0, heart, lose not thy nature ; let not ever * Holes. t Utmost stretch. The soul of Nero enter this firm bosom : Let me be cruel, not unnatural...
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Dramatic Works: From the Text of Johnson, Stevens and Reed; with ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1852
...[Exit PoLONltrs. Sam. By and by is easily said. Leave me, friends. [Exeunt Kos. GuiL. HOE. Sfc. 'Tis now the very witching time of night ; When churchyards...day Would quake to look on. Soft ; now to my mother, O, heart, lose not thy nature ; let not ever * Holes. t Utmost stretch. The soul of Nero enter...
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William Shakspeare's Complete Works, Dramatic and Poetic, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1852
...[Exit Polonms. Ham. By and by is easily said. Leave me, friend!). [Exeunt Ros. Guil. Hor. efe. . Andrus and Son O, heart, lose not thy nature ; let not ever The soul of Nero enter this firm bosom : Let me be cruel,...
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Men of Character, Volume 2

Douglas William Jerrold - 1852
...without a prompter," replied Shadowly, and then, fixed in his favourite attitude, began: " "T is now the very witching time of night; When churchyards...Contagion to this world. Now could I drink hot blood' " "There there!" exclaimed Applejohn, incapable of longer silence. Mr. Shadowly threw at him...
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The Life and Beauties of Shakespeare: Comprising Careful Selections from ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 345 pages
...MIDNIGHT. 'Tis now the very witching time of night; When churchyards yawn, and hell itself breathes oat Contagion to this world: Now could I drink hot blood,...Would quake to look on. Soft; now to my mother. O, heart, lose not thy nature; let not ever The soul of Nero enter this firm bosom: Let me be cruel,...
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The plays of Shakspere, carefully revised [by J.O.] with ..., Part 166, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1853
...easily said. Leave me, friends. [ /.',ir';/M{iisr.\iMi V\T/, GUILDENSTERN, HORATIO, Sfc. T is now the very witching time of night; When churchyards...this world : now could I drink hot blood, And do such bitter business as the day Would quake to look on. Soft ; now to my mother. 0 heart, lose not thy...
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The Complete Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge: With an ..., Volume 4

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1853
...last speech to Guildenstern ' Why, look you now,' &c. proves. Ib. Hamlet's soliloquy : Now could I drink hot blood, And do such business as the bitter day Would quake to look on. The utmost at which Hamlet arrives, is a disposition, a mood, to do something ; but what to do,...
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A Few Notes on Shakespeare, Volume 70

Alexander Dyce - 1853 - 156 pages
...Emblemes, 1586; " While grasse doth growe, the courser faire doth sterue " p. 26. Act iii. sc. 2. " Now could I drink hot blood, And do such business as the bitter day Would quake to look on." So Malone, adhering to the quartos ; while Mr. Collier and Mr. Knight adopt the reading of the folios,...
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Dictionary of Shakespearian Quotations: Exhibiting the Most Forcible ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 418 pages
...are savage wild ; More tierce and more inexorable far Than empty tigers, on the roaring sea. RJ v. 3. Now could I drink hot blood, And do such business as the bitter day Would quake to look on. H. iii. 2. No, I defy all counsel, all redress, But that which ends all counsel, true redress, Death,...
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