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" I cannot stand forward, and give praise or blame to any thing which relates to human actions, and human concerns, on a simple view of the object, as it stands, stripped of every relation, in all the nakedness and solitude of metaphysical abstraction.... "
The British Prose Writers - Page 11
1821
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The Yale Literary Magazine, Volumes 22-23

1857
..."Circumstances," says Edmund Burke, "give in reality to every political principle its distinguishing color and discriminating effect. The circumstances are what...political scheme beneficial or noxious to mankind." ity is lost, and, by deriving from each other mutual countenance and encouragement, they plunge into...
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The Works of Edmund Burke: With a Memoir, Volume 1

Edmund Burke - 1860
...relation, in all the nakedness and solitude of metaphysical abstraction. Circumstances (which with omo part, I never cast an eye on their flourishing commerce,...through a long series of fortunate events, and a train vet could I, in common sense, ten years ago, have felicitated France on her enjoyment of a government...
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Edmund Burke: A Historical Study

John Morley - 1867 - 312 pages
...concerned. " Circumstances," he says, never weary of laying down his great notion of political method, " give, in reality, to every political principle its...render every civil and political scheme beneficial or obnoxious to mankind." l This was, perhaps, the only guise in which his hearers in the House of Commons...
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Edmund Burke: A Historical Study

John Morley - 1867 - 312 pages
...concerned. " Circumstances," hejsayj^ never weary of laying down his great notion of political method, " give, in reality, to every political principle its...discriminating effect. The circumstances are what render everyjcivil and political scheme beneficial or_obnoxious _to mankind." l This was, perhaps, the only...
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Studies in English prose: specimens, with notes, by J. Payne

Joseph Payne - 1868
...simple view of the object, as it stands stripped of every relation in all the nakedness and solitude of metaphysical abstraction. Circumstances (which...gentlemen pass for nothing) give in reality to every (1) This is a fine specimen of climax the arranging of the members of a period or a paragraph of...
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THE WORKS OF THE RIGHT HONORABLE EDMUND BURKE.

1869
...simple view of the object, as it stands stripped of every relation, in all the nakedness and solitude of metaphysical abstraction.^ Circumstances (which...reality to every political principle its distinguishing color and discriminating effect. The circumstances are what render, every civil and political scheme...
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THE LIVES AND TIMES OF THE CHIEF JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED ...

HENRY FLANDERS - 1874
...some gentlemen pass for nothing) give in reality to every political principle its distinguishing color and discriminating effect. The circumstances are what...civil and political scheme beneficial or noxious to mankind.'1 Galloway was not the only member of the Congress who supported its measures, and finally...
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General Rules for Punctuation and for the Use of Capital Letters

Adams Sherman Hill - 1875 - 19 pages
...(c) When he was in a rage, and he often was in a rage, he swore like a porter. (d) Circumstances (which with some gentlemen pass for...reality to every political principle its distinguishing color and discriminating effect. (e), (a) In the insurrection of provinces, either distant or separated...
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Text-book of Prose: From Burke, Webster, and Bacon : with Notes, and ...

Henry Norman Hudson - 1876 - 636 pages
...simple view of the object, as it stands stripped of every relation, in all the nakedness and solitude of metaphysical abstraction. Circumstances (which...civil and political scheme beneficial or noxious to 1 The great paper from which the foregoing piece is taken, besides not being, as a whole, very well...
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History of English Thought in the Eighteenth Century, Volume 2

Leslie Stephen - 1876 - 935 pages
...propensity of the people to resort to ' theories.3 No constitution can be called good or bad in itself. ' The circumstances are what render every civil and...political scheme beneficial or noxious to mankind.' 4 Even in the heat of his onslaught upon French revolutionists, he admits that there may be situations...
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