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" ... twere, the mirror up to nature; to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure. "
Knight's Cabinet edition of the works of William Shakspere - Page 287
by William Shakespeare - 1843
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Exercises in Rhetorical Reading: With a Series of Introductory Lessons ...

Richard Green Parker - 1849 - 432 pages
...neither : but let your own discretion be your tutor. Suit the action to the word, the word to the 10 action ; with this special observance, that you o'erstep...overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end is to hold, as it were, the mirror up to nature ; to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own...
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The literary class book; or, Readings in English literature

Robert Joseph Sullivan - 1850
...out-herods Herod. Pray you, avoid it. Be not too tame neither ; but let your own discretion be our tutor. Suit the action to the word, the word to the...that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature ; for any thing so overdone is from the purpose of playing ; whose end, both at the first and now, was and...
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The speaker: or, Miscellaneous pieces selected from the best English writers ...

William Enfield, James Pycroft - 1851
...would have such a fellow whipped for o'erdoing Termagant; it out-herods Herod. Pray you, avoid it. Be not too tame neither ; but let your own discretion...overdone is from the purpose of playing ; whose end, both at the first and now, was and is, to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature ; to show Virtue her...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, from the text ..., Part 50, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1851
...o'erdoiug Termagant ; it ouWierods Herod : Pray you, avoid it. 1 Play. I warrant your honour. Ham. Be not too tame, neither, but let your own discretion...overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first, and now, was, and is, to hold, a? 'twere, the mirror up to nature ; to show virtue her...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With a Life of the Poet, and ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...o'erdoing Termagant ; it out-herods Herod. 'Pray you, avoid it. 1 Play. I warrant your honor. Ham. Be not too tame neither ; but let your own discretion...that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature ; for any thing so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first, and now, was, and...
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The dramatic (poetical) works of William Shakspeare; illustr ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1851
...o'erdoing Termagant ; ' it out-herods Herod. 'Pray you, avoid it. 1 Play. I warrant your honor. Ham. Be not too tame neither ; but let your own discretion...that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature ; for any thing so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first, and now, was, and...
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THE DRAMATIC WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE; ILLISTRATED: EMBRACING A LIFE OF ...

1851
...o'erdoing Termagant ; ] it out-herods Herod. 'Pray you, avoid it. 1 Play. I warrant your honor. Ham. Be not too tame neither; but let your own discretion...that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature ; for any thing so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first, and now, was, and...
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The Life and Beauties of Shakespeare: Comprising Careful Selections from ...

William Shakespeare - 1851 - 345 pages
...out-doing Termagant; it out-herods Herod. Pray you, avoid it. Play. I warrant your honour. Ham. Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion...observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature: for any thing so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first, and now, was, and...
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An Essay Upon the Ghost Belief of Shakespeare

Alfred Thomas Roffe - 1851 - 31 pages
...views of the Artistic in Acting, and substituting for the word Playing, the word Poetry. 14" Let your discretion be your Tutor ; suit the Action to the...o'erstep not the modesty of Nature ; for anything so done is from the purpose of Poetry, whose end, both at the first, and now, was, and is, to hold, as...
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Dramatic Works: From the Text of Johnson, Stevens and Reed; with ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1852
...o'erdoing Termagant ; it out-herods Herod : Pray you, avoid it. 1 Play. I warrant your honour. Ham. Be not too tame, neither, but let your own discretion...overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first, and now, was, and is, to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature ; to show virtue her...
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