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" This is the excellent foppery of the world, that, when we are sick in fortune,— often the surfeit of our own behaviour,— we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars : as if we were villains by necessity ; fools by' heavenly compulsion... "
The Beautiful in Nature, Art, and Life - Page 218
by Andrew James Symington - 1857
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The Star-seer: A Poem, in Five Cantos

William Dearden - 1837 - 173 pages
...in regard to Astrology, he is ready to exclaim with Edmund, in Shakspeare's tragedy of King Lear, " This is the excellent foppery of the world ! that, when we are sick in fortune, (often from the surfeit of our own behaviour,) we make guilty of our disasters, the sun, the moon, and the...
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The wisdom and genius of Shakspeare: comprising moral philosophy ...

William Shakespeare - 1838
...— What wound did ever heal, but by degrees ? 37— ii. 3. 250 Evils, wrongly ascribed to Heaven. This is the excellent foppery of the world ! that,...treachers,* by spherical predominance; drunkards, liars, and adulterers,by an enforced obedience of planetary influence; and all that we are evil in, by a divine...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1838
...the noble and true-hearted Kent banished! his ofiencc, honesty ! — Strange ! strange ! [Exit. Edm. This is the excellent foppery of the world ! that, when we are sick in fortune (often the surfeit ofour behaviour,) we make guilty of our disasters, the sun, the moon, and the stars : as if we were...
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Time and the Astrolabe in the Canterbury Tales

Marijane Osborn - 2002 - 350 pages
...articulate and clever one. Chaucer is as ironic about her views as Edmund is ironic in Xing Lear about how "we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon,...and the stars, as if we were villains by necessity." Neither Shakespeare's Edmund nor Chaucer accepts as an excuse "an enforc'd obedience of planetary influence"...
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Shakespearean Scholarship: A Guide for Actors and Students

Leslie O'Dell - 2002 - 413 pages
...excellent foppery of the world, diat when we are sick in fortune, often die surfeits of our own behavior, we make guilty of our disasters, the Sun, the Moon, and the Stars, as if we were villains on necessity, Fools by heavenly compulsion, Knaves, Thieves, and Treachers by Spherical predominance....
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The Wisdom of Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 2002 - 228 pages
...own petar. Hamlet — Hamlet III.iv Knavery's plain face is never seen till us'd. Iago— Othello Hi This is the excellent foppery of the world, that when we are sick in fortune, often the surfeits of our own behavior, we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon and stars: as if we...
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Shakespeare's Tragic Skepticism

Millicent Bell - 2002 - 283 pages
...were an ominous portent. A modern voice — and not a negligible one — is Edmund's when he says, "This is the excellent foppery of the world, that when we are sick in fortune, often the surfeits of our own behaviour, we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon and the stars, as...
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Victorian Appropriations of Shakespeare: George Eliot, A.C. Swinburne ...

Robert Sawyer - 2003 - 172 pages
...(254). This attitude sounds similar to the type of predisposition Edmund so carefully describes in Lear: This is the excellent foppery of the world, that,...are sick in fortune, often the surfeit of our own behavior, we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars;... An admirable evasion...
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Structure and Agency in Everyday Life: An Introduction to Social Psychology

Gil Richard Musolf - 2003 - 353 pages
...from King Lear. Determinism in the stars? Even Edmund knew that that was rationalization and evasion. This is the excellent foppery of the world, that when we are sick in fortune, often the surfeits of our own behavior, we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and stars; as if we...
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Shakespeare and the Human Mystery

J. Philip Newell - 2003 - 134 pages
...influences on our lives. Self-determination and the power of the will, he contends, is all that matters: This is the excellent foppery of the world, that when we are sick in fortune - often the surfeits of our own behaviour - we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and stars, as if...
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