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" This is the excellent foppery of the world, that, when we are sick in fortune,— often the surfeit of our own behaviour,— we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars : as if we were villains by necessity ; fools by' heavenly compulsion... "
The Beautiful in Nature, Art, and Life - Page 218
by Andrew James Symington - 1857
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Understanding Evil: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Margaret Sönser Breen - 2003 - 222 pages
...world. that. when we are sick in fortune.—often the surfeit of our own hehav iour.~we make guihy of our disasters the sun. the moon. and the stars: as if we were villains hy necessity; fools hy heavenly compulsion: knaves. thieves. and treachers. hy spherical predominance;...
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Cool, Hip & Sober: 88 Ways to Beat Booze and Drugs

Bill Manville, William Henry Manville - 2003 - 288 pages
...seem to be married to her. Your question raises an important issue for addicts. Blaming others. . . . when we are sick in fortune — often the surfeit of our own behavior — we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars: as if we were villains...
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The Construction of Tragedy: Hubris

Mary Anneeta Mann - 2004 - 228 pages
...from the mean. This in part is what Gloucester is trying to do and his son Edmund jeers at him for it: This is the excellent foppery of the world, that when...surfeit of our own behaviour we make guilty of our disaster the sun, the moon, and the stars, as if we were villains by necessity, fools by heavenly compulsion,...
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Understanding King Lear: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and ...

Donna Woodford - 2004 - 183 pages
...eclipses are signs of bad luck, and Edmund dismisses this and other beliefs in astrology as superstition: This is the excellent foppery of the world, that,...are sick in fortune, often the surfeit of our own behavior, we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars; as if we were villains...
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Shakespeare's King Lear with The Tempest: The Discovery of Nature and the ...

Mark Allen McDonald - 2004 - 317 pages
...leaving Edmund alone for his second soliloquy, on the folly of his father's belief. Edmund reflects: This is the excellent foppery of the world, that, when we are sick in fortune, often the surfeits of our own behavior, we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars; as...
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Radical Tragedy: Religion, Ideology, and Power in the Drama of Shakespeare ...

Jonathan Dollimore - 2004 - 312 pages
...metaphysically determined (and therefore unalterable): 'When we are sick in fortune, often the surfeits of our own behaviour, we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and stars; as if we were villains on necessity, fools by heavenly compulsion ... by a divine thrusting...
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King Lear

William Shakespeare, Paul Werstine - 2011 - 384 pages
...own behavior) we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and stars, as if we were villains on necessity; fools by heavenly compulsion; knaves, thieves, and treachers by spherical predominance; 130 drunkards, liars, and adulterers by an enforced obedience of planetary influence; and all that...
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The Three Lost Books of Healing

Sue Young - 2005 - 164 pages
...state. lts presence proves our feet upon the path. Permission to proceed with wisdom is all we need now. "This is the excellent foppery of the world, that...necessity, fools by heavenly compulsion, knaves, thieves, drunkards, liars, and adulterers by an enforced obedience of planetary influence ..." COMMON SENSE...
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Literature and Science: Social Impact and Interaction

John H. Cartwright, Brian Baker - 2005 - 471 pages
...brothers divide . . . the king falls from bias of nature. To which Edmund replies to himself: Edmund: This is the excellent foppery of the world, that when...sun, the moon, and the stars; as if we were villains of necessity, fools by heavenly compulsion, knaves thieves and treachers by spherical predominance,...
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Theater and Incarnation

Harris - 2005 - 155 pages
...relationships he holds so dear. But it is, says Edmund, "an admirable evasion of whoremaster man," to "make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and...villains by necessity; fools by heavenly compulsion" (I, ii). In any case, by the time of the storm scene, both Lear and Gloucester have lost their faith...
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