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" THERE is a bird, who by his coat, And by the hoarseness of his note, Might be supposed a crow; A great frequenter of the church, Where bishoplike he finds a perch, And dormitory too. Above the steeple shines a plate, That turns and turns, to indicate... "
The Poetical Works of William Cowper - Page 256
by William Cowper - 1854
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Early days; or, The Wesleyan scholar's guide, Volumes 10-12

1870
...fitly finish this littl paper. " There 'ua bird, who, hy his coat, And by the hoarseness of his notf, Might be supposed a crow ; A great frequenter of the church, Where, bishop-like, he finds a pert!: And dormitory too. " Above the steeple slimes a plate, That turns and turns, to indicate From...
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The Home Book of Verse, American and English, 1580-1918, Volume 1

1918 - 4009 pages
...rivers fair: Nature is always wise in every part. Edward Hovdl-Thurlaw [1781-1829] THE JACKDAW THERE is a bird, who by his coat. And by the hoarseness...to indicate From what point blows the weather; Look up your brains begin to swim, 'Tis in the clouds that pleases him, He chooses it the rather....
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Poems of the English Race

Raymond Macdonald Alden - 1921 - 410 pages
...billows and the sky. (1770) THE JACKDAW WILLIAM COWPER (From a Latin poem by Vincent Bourne) There is a bird, who, by his coat, And by the hoarseness of his note, Might be supposed a crow; A great _frequenter of the church, Where bishop-like he finds a perch, And dormitory too. Above the steeple...
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American Medicine, Volume 30

1924
...the twist." Learn to unearth, learn to unravel, lest you lose the auspicious union and indicant "That turns and turns to indicate From what point blows the weather." In influenza the interval of partial and dissembling exemption from pneumonia is so brief and uncertain,...
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The Twentieth Century, Volume 55

1904
...builds in our hollow trees, in our chimneys, in our castles, in our churches, in our cathedrals. There is a bird who, by his coat And by the hoarseness of...Where, bishop-like, he finds a perch And dormitory too. No ruined castle, no cathedral in England, would know itself without its colony, sometimes its huge...
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The Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine, Volume 3

Edward Hungerford Goddard - 1857
...or dead, were never allowed to have the Priory all to themselves. There is a bird who by his ooat, And by the hoarseness of his note * Might be supposed a crow: A great frequenter of the church, Where canon-like he finds a perch, And dormitory too. 2 s 2 When Mr. "Wyatt was erecting the north side of...
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Coming to Know: Studies in the Lexical Semantics and Pragmatics of Academic ...

Paul Georg Meyer - 1997 - 396 pages
...detailed analysis of this example in 5.1.2.1. Example (2c) is poetic rather than philosophical: (3)(2c) Above the steeple shines a plate, That turns and turns to indicate From what point blows the weather (Cowper, quoted from SOED) It shows that the same type of relation that we find between (1 b) and (2b)...
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