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" Like to the senators of the antique Rome, With the plebeians swarming at their heels, — Go forth, and fetch their conquering Caesar in : As, by a lower but by loving likelihood, Were now the general of our gracious empress {As, in good time, he may)... "
The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere - Page 497
by William Shakespeare - 1851
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The Works of William Shakespeare: Life, Glossary, &c : Reprinted ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1875 - 1124 pages
...With the plebeians swarming at their heels, — Go forth, and fetch their conquering Caesar in : , to this fight, Lei rlow many would the peaceful city quit. To welcome him ! much more, and much more cause, Did they this...
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King Henry V: Parallel Texts of the First Quart (1600) and First Folio (1623 ...

William Shakespeare - 1877 - 216 pages
...play is here necessary. In the Chorus at the beginning of Act V. the following passage occurs : — ' Were now the general of our gracious empress, As in...many would the peaceful city quit, To welcome him ! ' This is universally received as an allusion to the expedition of the Earl_of Essex, and o~must...
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: Henry V. Henry VIII

William Shakespeare - 1880
...pursuance of it, is highly probable. On the other hand, in the Chorus to Act v. we have the following : Were now the general of our gracious Empress — As...many would the peaceful city quit, To welcome him ! This undoubtedly refers to the Earl of Essex, who went on his expedition against the Irish rebels...
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Studies for candidates in select plays of Shakspeare

John Hunter (of Uxbridge.) - 1880
...of Essex was in that year, and the Chorus to the last Act has the following reference to it : — ' Were now the general of our gracious Empress, As in...How many would the peaceful city quit To welcome him ? ' But Essex incurred disgrace by his failure in the enterprise, and he returned suddenly, and in...
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New Readings & New Renderings of Shakespeare's Tragedies, Volume 2; Volume 144

Henry Halford Vaughan - 1881
...Allowing then this meaning to ' likelihood' it appears to me that we should read: As by a lower but living likelihood Were now the general of our gracious Empress,...would the peaceful city quit To welcome him !—much more—and much more cause Did they this Harry. That is,' as, (to introduce a lower but living object...
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The Cambridge Examiner

...have borne His bruised helmet and his bended sword Before him through the city." 2. Paraphrase : " Were now the general of our gracious empress, As in...How many would the peaceful city quit To welcome him !" W. ho is the general here referred to ? 3. Give the meaning of the following words as used by Shakespeare...
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The Oxford and Cambridge Shakespeare, with notes prepared specially for the ...

William Shakespeare - 1881
...swarming at their heels,— Go forth, and fetch their conquering Caesar in As, by>a lower but by loving b likelihood, Were now * the general of our gracious...on his sword, How many would the peaceful city quit 7 To welcome him ! much more (and much more cause) Did they this Harry. Now in London place him ; 1...
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Shakspere's works [from the text of N. Delius].

William Shakespeare - 1882
...at their heels, Go forth and fetch their conquering dzsar in : As, by a lower but loving lihelihood, Were now the general of our gracious empress, As in...the lamentation of the French Invites the King of England* 's stay at home ; The emperor coming in behalf of France, To order peace between them ; and...
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Shakespeare's King Henry V

William Shakespeare - 1882 - 151 pages
...their heels, Go forth and fetch their conquering Caesar in : As, by a lower but loving likelihood, 30 Were now the general of our gracious empress, As in...cause, Did they this Harry. Now in London place him ; 35 As yet the lamentation of the French Invites the King of England's stay at home : The emperor's...
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Shakespeare, from an American Point of View: Including an Inquiry as to His ...

George Wilkes - 1882 - 471 pages
...Essex's campaign in Ireland, and his hoped-for return, which took place in September of that year: " As, by a lower but by loving likelihood, Were now...many would the peaceful city quit, To welcome him! " " There can be no doubt," remarks Kenny, " that these lines refer to the expedition of the Earl of...
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