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" Though the earth, and all inferior creatures, be common to all men, yet every man has a property in his own person: this nobody has any right to but himself. The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his. "
Modern Political Philosophy - Page 46
by Richard Hudelson - 1999
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Queering Freedom

Shannon Winnubst - 2006 - 253 pages
...Enclosure dominates Locke's conceptual world. It is what affords him his basic premise of self-ownership: "every Man has a Property in his own Person. This no Body has any Right to but himself (section 27). The body is the temple of one's individuality, of one's clear and distinct separation...
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Tissue Economies: Blood, Organs, and Cell Lines in Late Capitalism

Catherine Waldby, Robert Mitchell - 2006 - 231 pages
...property (the commodity form). The classic definition of the category of self-possession ... is Locke's: "Every Man has a Property in his own Person. This no Body has any Right to but himself." This self-possessing subject is both the foundation of all other property rights, and the prototype...
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Cutting to the Core: Exploring the Ethics of Contested Surgeries

David Benatar - 2006 - 236 pages
...property in his own person." But Locke follows that sentence with another which ought to give us pause: "The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his." Locke says we own our labour, not our bodies. And we own our labour because it is the product of our...
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Intellectual Property Rights: Critical Concepts in Law, Volume 1

D. Vaver - 2006 - 312 pages
...individual's personality is itself a cultural product, we are hardly in a position to say with John Locke that "every Man has a Property in his own Person. This no Body has any Right to but himself.""4 And if the production of a "work of authorship," far from creation ex nihilo, is simply...
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Eigentum und Herrschaft bei John Locke und Immanuel Kant: ein ...

Susann Held - 2006 - 310 pages
...diametrale Äußerungen Lockes zurückführen206, der im Paragraphen 27 des zweiten Treatise schreibt: „The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his. Whatsover then he removes out of the state that nature hath provided, and left it in, he hath mixed...
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Political Theory

VD Mahajan - 2006 - 910 pages
...Before their use, man must appropriate them. "Every man has a property in his own person. Thus nobody has any right to but himself. The labour of his body and the work of his hand, we may say, are properly his". "Whatever a man removes out of its natural state, he has mixed...
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Global Biopiracy: Patents, Plants and Indigenous Knowledge

Ikechi Mgbeoji - 2007 - 336 pages
...theory in terms of possessive individualism, arguing that "every man has a property in his own person. The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say are properly his."59 Although the Lockean theory has influenced modern patent law, it does not explain the phenomenon...
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Employment with a Human Face: Balancing Efficiency, Equity, and Voice

John W. Budd - 2004 - 288 pages
...3056), "Every man has a property in his own person. This nobody has any right to but himself. The labor of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his." In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, this view was rejected by neoclassical economists and utilitarians...
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Lincoln's Defense of Politics: The Public Man and His Opponents in the ...

Thomas E. Schneider - 2006 - 224 pages
...Property" is "the Turfs my Servant has cut" (Second Treatise, §28). Still, Locke speaks of man as having "Property in his own Person. This no Body has any Right to but himself" (Second Treatise, §27). There is evidently a moral distinction in this respect between servants and...
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Mute Vol II #4 - Web 2.0

Mute - 2006 - 108 pages
...being human, a secularised version of divine creation. In his Second Treatise of Government, he wrote: every man has a property in his own person. This no body had any right to but himself. The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly...
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