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" And ne'er have spoke a loving word to you : But you at your sick service had a prince. Nay, you may think my love was crafty love, And call it cunning : do, an if you will. If Heaven be pleased that you must use me ill, Why, then you must. "
The Works of Shakespeare ... - Page 90
by William Shakespeare - 1907
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The Reading of Shakespeare

James Mason Hoppin - 1906 - 210 pages
...put out mine eyes ? These eyes that never did nor never shall So much as frown on you." Hubertó" I have sworn to do it; And with hot irons must I burn them out.'' Arthuró" Ah, none but in this iron age would do it! The iron of itself, though heat red-hot Approaching...
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Works ...

William Shakespeare - 1908
...crafty love And call it cunning. Do, an if you will. If heaven be pleas'd that you must use me ill, Why then you must. Will you put out mine eyes ? These...never did nor never shall So much as frown on you. Hubert. I have sworn to do it, And with hot irons must I burn them out. Arthur. Ah, none but in this...
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English Grammar and Composition

Alexander Malcolm Williams - 1909 - 395 pages
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Complete Works, Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1911
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare ...

William Shakespeare - 1911
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Boys' and Girls' Bookshelf: Little journeys into bookland

1912
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Shakespeare's Stories of the English Kings

Thomas Carter - 1912 - 284 pages
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Stories of Shakespeare's English History Plays

Hélène Adeline Guerber - 1912 - 315 pages
...a headache, forfeited his rest to nurse him? When he concludes his eloquent appeal with the words, 'will you put out mine eyes? These eyes that never did nor never shall so much as frown on you,' Hubert grimly insists he must do so, although Arthur vows he would not believe it should an angel state...
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Selections from English literature, by E. Lee, Book 1

Elizabeth Lee - 1913
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The Sewanee Review, Volume 23

1915
...nevere yet no vileinye ne sayde," or to exclaim with the late much advertised William Shakespeare, "The eyes that never did nor never shall so much as frown on you." Quote as we would, exclaim as we might, older heads who had travelled the same road of double negatives...
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