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" He grasp'd the mane with both his hands And eke with all his might. His horse, who never in that sort Had handled been before, What thing upon his back had got Did wonder more and more. Away went Gilpin neck or... "
Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Page 436
1819
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The Cambridge Book of Poetry and Song: Selected from English and American ...

Charlotte Fiske Bates Rogé - 1832 - 882 pages
...Beneath his well-shod feet. The snorting beast began to trot, Which galled him in his seat. So " Fair and softly." John he cried ; But John he cried in...vain: That trot became a gallop soon, In spite of curb and rein. So stooping down, as needs he must Who cannot sit upright. He grasped the mane with both...
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The Works of William Cowper: Table talk. The task. Tirocinium; or, A review ...

William Cowper - 1835
...well-shod feet, The snorting beast began to trot, Which gall'd him in his seat. So, " Fair and softly,'1 John he cried, But John he cried in vain ; That trot became a gallop soon, In spite of curb and rein. So stooping down, as needs he must Who cannot sit upright, He grasp'd the mane with both...
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Translation from Madame de La Mothe-Guion. The task. Tirocinium. John Gilpin ...

William Cowper - 1836
...Beneath his well-shod feet, The snorting beast began to trot, Which gall'd him in his seat. So, Fair and softly, John he cried, But John he cried in vain, That trot became a gallop soon In spite of curb and rein. So stooping down, as needs he must Who cannot sit upright, He grasp'd the mane with both...
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The Life and Works of William Cowper: Now First Completed by the ..., Volume 7

William Cowper - 1835
...Beneath his well shod feet, The snorting beast began to trot, Which gall'd him in his seat. So, fair and softly, John he cried, But John he cried in vain...; That trot became a gallop soon, In spite of curb and rein. So stooping down, as needs he must Who cannot sit upright, He grasp'd the mane with both...
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The Works of William Cowper, Esq., Comprising His Poems ..., Volume 9

William Cowper - 1836
...Beneath his well-shod feet, The snorting beast began to trot, Which gall'd him in his seat. So, Fair and softly, John he cried, But John he cried in vain, That trot became a gallop soon In spite of curb and rein. So stooping down, as needs he must Who cannot sit upright, He grasp'd the mane with both...
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Translation from Madame de La Mothe-Guion. The task. Tirocinium. John Gilpin ...

William Cowper - 1836
...softly, John he cried, But John he cried in vain, That trot became a gallop soon In spite of curb and rein. So stooping down, as needs he must Who cannot sit upright, He grasp'd the mane with both his hands And eke with all his might. His horse, who never in that sort...
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Poems; to which is prefixed a memoir of the author by J. M'Diarmid

William Cowper - 1837
...Beneath his well-shod feet, The snorting beast began to trot, Which gall'd him in his seat. So, Fair and softly, John he cried, But John he cried in vain...; That trot became a gallop soon, In spite of curb and rein. So stooping down, as needs he must, Who cannot sit upright, He grasp'd the mane with both...
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Select poetry for children: with notes, arranged by J. Payne

Joseph Payne - 1839
...Which galled him in his seat. [1] When Ida exercise— as captain of one of the trainbands. So, " fair and softly! " John he cried, But John he cried in...; That trot became a gallop soon, In spite of curb and rein. So stooping down, as needs he must, Who cannot sit upright, He grasped the mane with both...
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The Poetical Works of William Cowper

William Cowper - 1839 - 516 pages
...softly ! John he cried; But John he eried in vain, That trot beeame a gallop soon, In spite of curb and rein. So stooping down, as needs he must Who cannot sit upright, He grasp'd the mane with both his hands And eke with all his might. His horse, who never in that sort...
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Selections from the British Poets, Volume 2

1840
...Beneath his well-shod feet, The snorting beast began to trot, Which gall'd him in his seat. So, " Fair and softly," John he cried, But John he cried in vain...; That trot became a gallop soon, In spite of curb and rein. So, stooping down, as needs he must Who cannot sit upright, He grasp'd the mane with both...
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