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" The fig-tree ; not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such as at this day, to Indians known, In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillar'd... "
Paradise lost, a poem. With the life of the author [by E. Fenton]. - Page 215
by John Milton - 1800
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Select Works of the British Poets: With Biographical and Critical ..., Volume 2

John Aikin - 1821 - 807 pages
...this new comer, Shame, There sit not, and reproach us as unclean." So counsell'd he, and both together went Into the thickest wood ; there soon they chose...renown'd, But such as at this day, to Indians known, In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs...
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The British poets, including translations, Volume 17

British poets - 1822
...new comer, Shame, There sit not, and reproach us as unclean." So counsell'd he ; and both together went Into the thickest wood : there soon they chose...renown'd, But such as at this day, to Indians known, In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs...
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Sketch of the Mosquito Shore: Including the Territory of Poyais, Descriptive ...

Thomas Strangeways - 1822 - 355 pages
...Africa, as well as the tropical parts of America, is described by our divine poet with great exactness. " The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such as at this day to Indians known In Malabar and Pecan, spreads her arm?, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bearded twigs...
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The Ladies' pocket magazine

1836
...have recourse alter having ealea the forhidden fruit : . So counselled he ; and both together went Into the thickest wood : there soon they chose...to Indians known, In Malahar or Decan spreads her a rax, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs takes root, and daughters grow...
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The Poetical Works of John Milton ...

John Milton - 1824 - 131 pages
...shame, There sit not, and reproach us as unclean." ~ So counsell'd he, and both together went 1099 Into the thickest wood; there soon they chose The...fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such ae at this day to Indians known In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms Branching so broad and long, that...
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Oeuvres, Volume 15

Jacques Delille - 1824
...Alors vers la forêt tous deux prennent leur route : Parmi les plants nombreux qui composent sa voûte, The fig-tree ; not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such as at this day, to Indians known, In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs...
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The Wonders of Elora: Or, The Narrative of a Journey to the Temples and ...

John Benjamin Seely - 1825 - 597 pages
...pillars. Why should I proceed farther in description, when Milton has so sweetly sung its characters ? " The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renown'd But such as at this day to India known In Malabar or Deccan spreads her arms, * No fruit in England, in my opinion, is equal to...
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First Steps to Botany [...]

James Lawson Drummond - 1826 - 391 pages
...the leaves, however, are certainly not "broad as Amazonian targe." So counsel'd he, and both together went Into the thickest wood; there soon they chose...renown'd, But such as at this day to Indians known In Malabar or Decan, spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs...
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The Poetical Works of John Milton: To which is Prefixed the Life of the Author

John Milton - 1829 - 375 pages
...they chose The fig-tree ; not that kind for fruit renown'd, Mut such as at this day to Indians knawli In Malahar or Decan, spreads her arms Branching so hroad and long, that in the ground The hended tw igs take root, and daughters grow Ahout the mother tree, a pillar'd shade High overarth'd, aiid...
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Four Years' Residence in the West Indies

Frederic William Naylor Bayley - 1830 - 693 pages
...pleasant shade. Edwards calls it a forest in itself, and quotes Milton in its favor : " The fig tree ; not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such as at this day, to Indians known, In Malabar and Decan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bearded twigs...
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