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" His first defect is that to which may be imputed most of the evil in books or in men. He sacrifices virtue to convenience, and is so much more careful to please than to instruct, that he seems to write without any moral purpose. From his writings indeed... "
The dramatic (poetical) works of William Shakspeare; illustr., embracing a ... - Page xxxiii
by William Shakespeare - 1850
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Johnson on Shakespeare

Samuel Johnson - 1908 - 208 pages
...pretensions to renown ; and little regard is due to that bigotry which sets candour higher than truth. His first defect is that to which may be imputed most...virtue to convenience, and is so much more careful to glease than to PREFACE 21 without any moral purpose. From his writings indeed , a^system of social...
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Sources of Dramatic Theory: Volume 2, Voltaire to Hugo

D. J. Conacher - 1991 - 292 pages
...pretensions to renown; and little regard is due to that bigotry which sets candor higher than truth. His first defect is that to which may be imputed most...moral purpose. From his writings indeed a system of social duty may be selected, for he that thinks reasonably must think morally; but his precepts and...
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William Shakespeare: The Critical Heritage, Volume 5

Brian Vickers - 1995 - 568 pages
...pretensions to renown; and little regard is due to that bigotry which sets candour1 higher than truth. His first defect is that to which may be imputed most...is so much more careful to please than to instruct 2 'Analogy': '1. Resemblance between things with regard to some circumstances or effects'; 3. 'By grammarians,...
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The Tragedy of King Lear: With Classic and Contemporary Criticisms

William Shakespeare - 2008 - 340 pages
...pretensions to renown; and little regard is due to that bigotry which sets candor higher than truth. His first defect is that to which may be imputed most...moral purpose. From his writings indeed a system of social duty may be selected, for he that thinks reasonably must think morally; but his precepts and...
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The Gentleman's Magazine, Volume 263

1887
...excellencies has likewise faults, and faults sufficient to obscure and overwhelm any other merit. . . . His first defect is that to which may be imputed most...that he seems to write without any moral purpose. . . . The plots are often so loosely formed that a very slight consideration may improve them," &c....
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