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" His first defect is that to which may be imputed most of the evil in books or in men. He sacrifices virtue to convenience, and is so much more careful to please than to instruct, that he seems to write without any moral purpose. From his writings indeed... "
The dramatic (poetical) works of William Shakspeare; illustr., embracing a ... - Page xxxiii
by William Shakespeare - 1850
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Eighteenth Century Essays on Shakespeare

David Nichol Smith - 1903 - 358 pages
...pretensions to renown ; and little regard is due to that bigotry which sets candour higher than truth. His first defect is that to which may be imputed most...virtue to convenience, and is so much more careful to j>lease ^thanto instruct, that he seems to write without any moral purpose. From his writings indeed...
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English Essays

Walter Cochrane Bronson - 1905 - 404 pages
...pretensions to renown, and little regard is due to that bigotry which sets candor higher than truth. 20 His first defect is that to which may be imputed most...moral purpose. From his writings, indeed, a system of social duty may be selected, 25 for he that thinks reasonably must think morally: but his precepts...
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Famous Introductions to Shakespeare's Plays by the Notable Editors of the ...

Beverley Ellison Warner - 1906 - 268 pages
...pretensions to renown ; and little regard is due to that bigotry which sets candour higher than truth. His first defect is that to which may be imputed most...convenience, and is so much more careful to please than v to instruct, that he seems to write without any moral purpose. From his writings indeed a system...
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Johnson on Shakespeare: Essays and Notes

Samuel Johnson, Sir Walter Alexander Raleigh - 1908 - 206 pages
...pretensions to renown ; and little regard is due to that bigotry which sets candour higher than truth. His first defect is that to which may be imputed most...moral purpose. From his writings indeed a system of social duty may be selected, fpr he that thinks reasonably must think morally ; but his precepts and...
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Shakspeare's Dramatic Art: History and Character of Shakspeare's Plays, Volume 2

Hermann Ulrici - 1908
...reproaches against Shakspeare which are more or less unfounded. His chief fault is said to be that ' he sacrifices virtue to convenience, and is so much...moral purpose. From his writings, indeed, a system of social duty may be selected, for he that thinks reasonably must think morally ; but his precepts and...
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Readings in English Prose of the Eighteenth Century

Raymond Macdonald Alden - 1911 - 724 pages
...pretensions to renown, and little regard is due to that bigotry" which sets candor l higher than truth. His first defect is that to which may be imputed most...moral purpose. From his writings, indeed, a system of social duty may be selected, for he that thinks reasonably must think morally; but his precepts and...
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Readings in English Prose of the Eighteenth Century

Raymond Macdonald Alden - 1911 - 724 pages
...pretensions to renown, and little regard is due to that bigotry which sets candor * higher than truth. His first defect is that to which may be imputed most...moral purpose. From his writings, indeed, a system of social duty may be selected, for he that thinks reasonably must think morally; but his precepts and...
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Readings in English Prose of the Eighteenth Century

Raymond Macdonald Alden - 1911 - 724 pages
...to renown, and little regard is due to that bigotry which sets candor l higher than truth. ' ) His first defect is that to which may be imputed most...without any moral purpose. From his writings, indeed, ri a system of social duty may be selected, for he that jjiinks rea^-spnably must thinkjmorally; but...
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What to Expect of Shakespeare

Jean Jules Jusserand - 1911 - 24 pages
...each word, stated that Shakespeare's 'first defect is that to which may be imputed most of the evils in books or in men. He sacrifices virtue to convenience,...instruct that he seems to write without any moral purpose ... It is always a writer's duty to make the world better.' Nearer our time, another, no enemy like...
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The Harvard Classics, Volume 39

Charles William Eliot - 1909
...pretensions to renown; and little regard is due to that bigotry which sets candour higher than truth. His first defect is that to which may be imputed most...moral purpose. From his writings indeed a system of social duty may be selected, for he that thinks reasonably must think morally; but his precepts and...
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