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" Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep In the affliction of these terrible dreams That shake us nightly. Better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our peace, have sent to peace, Than on the torture of the mind to lie In restless ecstacy. Duncan is... "
Macbeth. King John. King Richard II.-v. 2. King Henry IV. King Henry V.-v. 3 ... - Page 46
by William Shakespeare - 1807
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The family Shakespeare [expurgated by T. Bowdler]. in which those words are ...

William Shakespeare - 1843
...to gain our place, have sent to peace, Than on the torture of the mind to lie In restless ecstasy. ' chain ? Dro. S. No, no, the hell ; 'tis time that...two ere I left him, and now the clock strikes one 1 BccauwoC Mart meUncholv. Afunj. MACBETH. Malice domcMick, foreign levy, nothing, Can touch him...
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Practical Elocution: Containing Illustrations of the Principles of Reading ...

Samuel Niles Sweet - 1843 - 300 pages
...The multitudinous seas incarnardine, Making the green one red." " Better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our place, have sent to peace, Than on...the torture of the mind to lie In restless ecstacy [agony] " Macbeth means that his hands are so deeply stained with blood, that should he wash them...
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The Antiquities of Gainford, in the County of Durham: Comprising the ...

John Richard Walbran - 1846 - 154 pages
...did not allow John Baliol to be reckoned among the kings of that realm. But what recks it now : DUNCAN is in his grave ; After life's fitful fever,...has done his worst : nor steel, nor poison, Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing Can touch him further 1" Dante, from his own sufficiently disturbed...
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Studies of Shakespeare: In the Plays of King John, Cymbeline, Macbeth, As ...

George Fletcher - 1847 - 384 pages
...apprehension for the future. He continues: Better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our peace, have sent to peace, Than on the torture of the mind...has done his worst ; nor steel, nor poison, Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing, Can touch him further ! The lady's answer Come on, Gentle my lord,...
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Dramatic Works and Poems, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1847
...these terrible dreams That shake us nightly : Bettor be with the dead, Whom we, to gam our ulaoe^' have sent to peace, Than on the torture of the mind...Duncan is in his grave , After life's fitful fever, he steeps well : Treason has done his worst ; nor steel, nor poison. Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing,...
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Shakespeare's Plays: With His Life, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1847
...we to gain our peace have sent to peace, Than on the torture of the mind to lie In restless ecstasy. I but speak thy deeds. What committed? domestic, foreign levy, nothing Can touch him further! Lady M. Come on : Gentle my lord, sleek o'er...
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The Patrician, Volume 3

John Burke, Bernard Burke - 1847
...Thou dost look Like Patience, gazing on King's graves, and smiling Extremity out of act. SHAKESPEARE. Duncan is in his grave ; After life's fitful fever,...has done his worst : nor steel, nor poison, Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing, Can touch him farther ! Ibid. AMONG the many evidences of the mere...
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An Inquiry Into the Philosophy and Religion of Shakspere

William John Birch - 1848 - 547 pages
...the ills of life, but bringing us from bad to worse. Macbeth says : Better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our place, have sent to peace, Than on...has done his worst ; nor steel nor poison, Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing Can touch him further ! Another catalogue of the ills of life to be...
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Macbeth: A Cragedy in Five Acts

William Shakespeare - 1848 - 60 pages
...sleep In the affliction of these terrible dreams, That shake us nightly : better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our place, have sent to peace, Than on...has done his worst ; nor steel, nor poison, Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing, Can touch him further ! [Retires, R. Lady M. Come on ; gentle my lord,...
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Macbeth: A Tragedy in Five Acts

William Shakespeare - 1847 - 60 pages
...sleep In the affliction of these terrible dreams, That shake us nightly : better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our place, have sent to .peace, Than on...of the mind to lie, In restless ecstacy. Duncan is iti his grave ; After life's fitful fever, he sleeps well; Treason has done his worst; nor steel, nor...
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