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" Shine not in vain ; nor think, though men were none, That heaven would want spectators, God want praise. Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep. All these with ceaseless praise his works behold Both... "
Paradise lost, a poem. Pr. from the text of Tonson's correct ed. of 1711 - Page 114
by John Milton - 1801
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Essays from Addison

Joseph Addison - 1907 - 112 pages
...old Hesiod, which is almost word for word the same with his third line in the following passage. — Nor think, though men were none, That Heaven would...praise : Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth 20 Unseen, both when we wake and when we sleep ; All these with ceaseless praise his works behold Both...
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Sir Roger de Coverley and the Spectator's Club

Sir Richard Steele, Joseph Addison - 1908 - 192 pages
...in old Hesiod, which is almost word for word the same with his third line in the following passage : —Nor think, though men were none, That heaven would...; All these with ceaseless praise His works behold Loth day and night. How often from the steep Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices...
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Complete Poetical Works

John Milton - 1908 - 554 pages
...then, though unbeheld in deep of night, Shine not in vain, nor think, though men were none, That heav'n would want spectators, God want praise ; Millions...both when we wake, and when we sleep : All these with ceasless praise his works behold Both day and night : how often from the steep 680 Of echoing Hill...
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A Poet's Anthology of Poems

Alfred Noyes - 1911 - 407 pages
...whom This glorious sight, when sleep hath shut all eyes?" To whom our general ancestor replied : " Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen,...behold Both day and night : how often from the steep Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive...
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The Complete Poetical Works of John Milton

John Milton - 1924 - 419 pages
...to receive Perfection from the Sun's more potent ray. These, then, though uubeheld in deep of night, Shine not in vain. Nor think, though men were none,...walk the Earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we All these with ceaseless praise his works behold Both day and night. How often, from the steep 680...
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The Leading English Poets from Chaucer to Browning: Ed., with Introduction ...

Lucius Hudson Holt - 1915 - 918 pages
...to receive Perfection from the Sun's more potent ray. These, then, though unbeheld in deep of night, us Hudson Holt sleep: AH these with ceaseless praise his works behold Both day and night. How often, from the t steep...
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The Hills of Contemplation: Throughts for Contemplation for Every Day of the ...

Fiona McKay - 1917 - 452 pages
...pleasing Him alone; do not seek to be known by men. St. Chrysostom. Nor think, though men were worse, That heaven would want spectators, God want praise...walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake and when we sleep. And these with ceaseless praise His works behold. Milton. BENEDICTION, and glory, and wisdom,...
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Selections from the Prose and Poetry of John Milton

John Milton - 1923 - 310 pages
...to receive Perfection from the Sun's more potent ray. These, then, though unbeheld in deep of night, Shine not in vain. Nor think, though men were none,...behold Both day and night. How often, from the steep eso Of echoing hill or thicket, have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive...
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The Complete Poetical Works of John Milton

John Milton - 1924 - 419 pages
...to receive Perfection from the Sun's more potent ray. These, then, though nnbeheld in deep of night, Shine not in vain. Nor think, though men were none,...his works behold Both day and night. How often, from th« steep 680 Of echoing hill or thicket, have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole,...
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The Harvard Classics, Volume 4

Charles William Eliot - 1909
...to receive Perfection from the Sun's more potent ray. These then, though unbeheld in deep of night, Shine not in vain. Nor think, though men were none,...behold Both day and night. How often, from the steep Of echoing hill or thicket, have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air. Sole, or responsive...
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