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" Shine not in vain ; nor think, though men were none, That heaven would want spectators, God want praise. Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep. All these with ceaseless praise his works behold Both... "
Paradise lost, a poem. Pr. from the text of Tonson's correct ed. of 1711 - Page 114
by John Milton - 1801
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Paradise lost, a poem

John Milton - 1821
...tho' unbeheld in deep of night, 674 Shine not in vain ; nor think, tho' men were none, That Heav'n would want spectators, God want praise. Millions of...behold Both day and night. How often from the steep 600 Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive...
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The English Reader, Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry: Selected from the Best ...

Lindley Murray - 1821 - 264 pages
...though unheheld in deep of night, , Shine not in vain ; nor think, though men were none, That heav'n would want spectators, God want praise ; Millions...works behold, Both day and night. How often, from the sleep Of echoing hill or thicket hnve we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive...
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Paradise Lost: A Poem, Volume 1

John Milton - 1821
...to receive Perfection from the sun's more potent ray. These then, though unbeheld in deep of night, Shine not in vain; nor think, though men were none,...want praise ; Millions of spiritual creatures walk Ihe earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep: All these with ceaseless praise his works behold...
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The English Reader: Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry, Selected from the Best ...

Lindley Murray - 1821 - 263 pages
...though unbeheld in deep of night, Shine not in vain ; nor think, though men were none, That heav'n would want spectators, God want praise ; Millions...walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleepv All these with ceaseless praise his works behold, Both day and night. How often, from the steep...
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The English Reader: Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry, Selected from the Best ...

Lindley Murray - 1821 - 253 pages
...though unbeheld in deep of night, Shine not in vain ; nor think, though men were none$ That heav'n would want spectators, God want praise : Millions...walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep. AlUiiese with ceasless praise his works behold, Both day and night. How often, from the steep...
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Murray's English Reader: Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry, Selected from the ...

Lindley Murray, Jeremiah Goodrich - 1822 - 304 pages
...then, though unbehcld in deep of night, Shine not in vain; nor think, though men were none, That heav'n would want spectators, God want praise; Millions of...behold, . Both day and night. How often, from the sleep Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive...
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The English reading book, in verse

William Jillard Hort - 1822 - 212 pages
...Eve bespake, The general mother of the human race. These lights, though unbeheld in deep of night, Shine not in vain ; nor, think, though men were none,...walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep. AH these, with ceaseless praise, his works behold Both day and night : how often from the ste.ep...
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The English Reader; Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry: Selected from the Best ...

Lindley Murray - 1822 - 264 pages
...mght, Siiine not in vain; nor think, though men were no; That heaven would want spectators, God wam praise: Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth...both when we wake, and when we sleep. All these with ceasless praise his works behold, Both day and night. Haw often, from the steep Of echoing; hill -r'thicket,...
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Paradise lost, a poem

John Milton - 1823
...to receive Perfection from the sun's more potent ray. These then, though unheheld in deep of night, Shine not in vain ; nor think, though men were none,...sleep ; All these with ceaseless praise his works hehold Both day and night : How often from the steep Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial...
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The British Essayists: Spectator

Lionel Thomas Berguer - 1823
...the same with his third line in the following passage : Nor think, though men were none, That heav'n would want spectators, God want praise : Millions...behold Both day and night. How often from the steep Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive...
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