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" Shine not in vain ; nor think, though men were none, That heaven would want spectators, God want praise. Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep. All these with ceaseless praise his works behold Both... "
Paradise lost, a poem. Pr. from the text of Tonson's correct ed. of 1711 - Page 114
by John Milton - 1801
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Apparitions: Or, The Mystery of Ghosts, Hobgoblins, and Haunted Houses Developed

Joseph Taylor - 1815 - 242 pages
...with his third line in the following passage: — * Nor think, though men were none, That I lea v" n would want spectators, God want praise: Millions of...walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake and when we sleepj All these with ceaseless praise his works behold, Both day and night. How often from the steep...
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The Spectator [by J. Addison and others]: with sketches of the lives of the ...

Spectator The - 1816
...the same with his third line in the following passage: Nor think, though men were none, That hcav'n would want spectators, God want praise : Millions...behold Both day and night. How often from the steep Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive...
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The beauties of The Spectator 2nd ed., revised and enlarged with The vision ...

Spectator The - 1816
...in old Hesiod, which is almost word for word the same with his third line in the following passage. Nor think, though men were none, That heaven would...walk the earth Unseen , both when we wake and when we deep; All these with ceaseless praise his works behold Both day and night. How often from the steep...
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The English Reader: Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry, Selected from the Best ...

Lindley Murray - 1816 - 254 pages
...though unbeheld in deep of night, Shine not in vain ; nor think, though men were none, That heav'n would want spectators, God want praise : Millions...Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep. All these witty ceaseless praise his works behold, Both day and night. How often, from the steep Of echoing hill...
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Poems on various subjects: selected to enforce the practice of virtue, and ...

E Tomkins - 1817 - 260 pages
...to receive Perfection from the sun's more potent ray. These then, though nnbeheld in deep of night, Shine not in vain ; nor think, though men were none,...would want spectators, God want praise. Millions of spirit uul creatures walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake and when we sleep : All these with ceaseless...
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Sacred Biography: Or, The History of the Patriarchs. To which is ..., Volume 3

Henry Hunter - 1818
...words which our knmortal bard puts in the mouth of Adam, first of men, addressed to his fair consort-'" Nor think, though men were none, That heaven would...ceaseless praise his works behold, Both day and night." If our ears were not dull and limited as our spirits — " How often, from the steep Of echoing hill...
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The American Orator, Or, Elegant Extracts in Prose and Poetry: Comprehending ...

Increase Cooke - 1819 - 408 pages
...to receive Perfection from the sun's more potent ray. These then, though unbeheld in deep of night, Shine not in vain ; nor think though men were none,...behold, Both day and night. How often, from the steep Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive...
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The British essayists; to which are prefixed prefaces by J. Ferguson, Volume 37

British essayists - 1819
...same with his third line in the following passage : — Nor think, though men were none, That heav'n would want spectators, God want praise : Millions...behold Both day and night. How often from the steep Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive...
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The Kilmarnock mirror, and literary gleaner, Volume 1

1819
...lex naturffi P'itanih est. Tusc. Ouast. lib. 1 . ^ Bar»w, vol. vp 195.. On Supernatural Powers. " Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen,...behold, Both day and night : how often from the steep Of echoing hill or thicket, have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive...
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Select Works of the British Poets: With Biographical and Critical ..., Volume 1

John Aikin - 1820 - 807 pages
...to receive Perfection from the Sun's more potent ray. These then, though unbeheld in deep of night, : bow often from the steep Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight...
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