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" becaufe human judgment, though it be gradually gaining upon certainty, never becomes infallible, and approbation, though long continued, may yet be only the approbation of prejudice or "
The Monthly Magazine - Page 602
1800
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Prefaces and Prologues to Famous Books

William Caxton, Jean Calvin, Nicolaus Copernicus, John Knox, Edmund Spenser, Sir Walter Raleigh, Francis Bacon, John Heminge, Henry Condell, Sir Isaac Newton, Henry Fielding, Samuel Johnson, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, William Wordsworth, Walt Whitman - 1910 - 462 pages
...devolved from one generation to another, have received new honours at every transmission. But because human judgment, though it be gradually gaining upon...continued, may yet be only the approbation of prejudice or fashion; it is proper to inquire, by what peculiarities of excellence Shakespeare has gained and kept...
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Prefaces and Prologues to Famous Books: With Introduction and Notes

William Caxton - 1910 - 437 pages
...devolved from one generation to another, have received new honours at every transmission. But because human judgment, though it be gradually gaining upon...and approbation, though long continued, may yet be onLv the approbation of prejudice or fashion; it is proper to inquire, by what peculiarities of excellence...
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Johnson on Shakespeare

Samuel Johnson - 1908 - 208 pages
...devolved from one generation to another, have received new honours at every transmission. But because human judgment, though it be gradually gaining upon...continued, may yet be only the approbation of prejudice or fashion; it is proper to inquire, by what peculiarities of excellence Shakespeare has gained and kept...
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Literary Criticism, Pope to Croce

Gay Wilson Allen, Harry Hayden Clark - 1962 - 659 pages
...devolved from one generation to another, have received new honors at every transmission. But because human judgment, though it be gradually gaining upon...continued, may yet be only the approbation of prejudice or fashion, it is proper to inquire by what peculiarities of excellence Shakespeare has gained and kept...
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Goethe: A Critical Introduction

Ronald Gray, Ronald D. Gray - 1967 - 288 pages
...least a measure of general agreement. To quote Johnson, with a small adaptation,one last time: 'because human judgment, though it be gradually gaining upon...continued, may yet be only the approbation of prejudice or fashion; it is proper to inquire, by what peculiarities of excellence [Goethe] has gained and kept...
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Samuel Johnson: Selected Poetry and Prose

Frank Brady, William Wimsatt - 1978 - 656 pages
...devolved from one generation to another, have received new honors at every transmission. But because human judgment, though it be gradually gaining upon...continued, may yet be only the approbation of prejudice or fashion; it is 1. The Greek philosopher Pythagoras discovered that the principal intervals of the musical...
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Sources of Dramatic Theory: Volume 2, Voltaire to Hugo

D. J. Conacher - 1991 - 292 pages
...devolved from one generation to another, have received new honors at every transmission. But because human judgment, though it be gradually gaining upon...continued, may yet be only the approbation of prejudice or fashion; it is proper to inquire, by what peculiarities of excellence Shakespeare has gained and kept...
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"Steel for the Mind": Samuel Johnson and Critical Discourse

Charles H. Hinnant - 1994 - 251 pages
...there is always in Johnson a qualifying insistence that "approbation" is never absolutely certain, for "approbation, though long continued, may yet be only the approbation of prejudice or fashion" (Shakespeare, VII: 61). Indeed, the notion of the consensus gentium can actually mislead the...
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Common Courtesy in Eighteenth-century English Literature

William Bowman Piper - 1997 - 200 pages
...the common sense of literature was never altogether firm: "Human judgment," he writes in the preface, "though it be gradually gaining upon certainty, never...continued, may yet be only the approbation of prejudice or fashion." We may recall further certain facts immediately pertinent to literary common sense that Johnson...
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