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" Methinks I should know you, and know this man; Yet I am doubtful; for I am mainly ignorant What place this is; and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me; For (as I am a man)... "
The Works of Shakespear: King Lear. Timon of Athens. Titus Andronicus. Macbeth - Page 96
by William Shakespeare - 1768
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The Century, Volume 26

1883
...witness an actual restoration from the jaws of death to life. And the climax, reached in the words, " Do not laugh at me ; For, as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia" is as subdued, as low in tone, and as real as had been the preparation for it. Nothing can be more...
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King Lear

William Shakespeare - 1999 - 142 pages
...have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me; 70 For, as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia. CORDELIA And so I am! I am! LEAR Be your tears wet? Yes, faith. I pray weep not. If you have poison...
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The Oxford Shakespeare: The History of King Lear

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 336 pages
...have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me, 65 For as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child, Cordelia. CORDELIA And so I am . LEAR Be your tears wet? Yes, faith. I pray, weep not. If you have poison for...
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Shakespeare and Masculinity

Bruce R. Smith, Bruce R. (Professor of English Smith, Professor of English Georgetown University Washington DC) - 2000 - 182 pages
...around him. No longer a king, he acknowledges first the simple fact of his manhood, then his fatherhood: 'For as I am a man, I think this lady | To be my child, Cordelia' ( The Tragedy of King Lear, 4.6.52-3, 62-3, emphasis added). Lear's new-found identity is neither the...
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King Lear: The 1608 Quarto and 1623 Folio Texts

William Shakespeare - 2000 - 270 pages
...of the mark 50 abused ill-used, deceived 57 fond (the word also means "foolish") 62 mainly entirely For, as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia. CORDELIA And so I am, I am. LEAR Be your tears wet? Yes, faith, I pray, weep not. If you have poison...
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King Lear

Jennifer Mulherin, Abigail Frost - 2001 - 31 pages
...this is, and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me; For, as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia. Act iv Sc vii 24 Come, let's away to prison; We two alone will sing like birds i' the cage: When thou...
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King Lear

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 144 pages
...this is, and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me; For, as I am a man, I think this lady To he my child Cordelia. CORDELIA And so I am, I am. LEAR Be your tears wet? Yes, faith. I pray, weep...
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King Lear: A Guide to the Play

Jay L. Halio - 2001 - 128 pages
...mature acceptance of human dependency" (p. 107). When he awakens from the healing sleep in 4.6 and says, "For, as I am a man, I think this lady / To be my child Cordelia" (66-67), Lear not only acknowledges his manhood and his daughter's womanhood, but also Cordelia as...
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Shakespeare for My Father: A One-woman Play in Two Acts

Lynn Redgrave, William Shakespeare - 2001 - 61 pages
...prick. Would I were assur'd Of my condition! Pray, do not mock me: I fear I am not in my perfect mind. For, as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia. CORDELIA. And so I am, I am. LEAR. Be your tears wet? Yes, faith. I pray, weep not: If you have poison...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 33

Kenneth Muir - 2002 - 236 pages
...his perfect mind, admits to confusion and ignorance about where he finds himself on waking, and then Do not laugh at me; For as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia. (1v, vii, 68-70) When last he saw Cordelia, his 'sometime daughter', Lear had an inexhaustible store...
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