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" Of every hearer; for it so falls out That what we have we prize not to the worth Whiles we enjoy it, but being lack'd and lost, Why, then we rack the value, then we find The virtue that possession would not show us Whiles it was ours. "
Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Page 269
1897
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: From the Text of ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1825
...maintain'd, Upon the instant that she was accus'd, Shall be lamented, pitied, and excus'd, Of every hearer: For it so falls out, That what we have we prize not to the worth, Whilest we enjoy it ; but being lack'd and lost, Why, then we rack:): the value ; then we find The...
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Measure for measure. Much ado about nothing. Midsummer-night's dream. Love's ...

William Shakespeare - 1826
...maintain'd, Upon the instant that she was accus'd, Shall be lamented, pitied and excus'd, Of every hearer : For it so falls out, That what we have we prize not...enjoy it ; but being lack'd and lost, Why, then we rack16 the value; then we find The virtue, that possession would not show us Whiles it was ours : —...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Measure for measure. Midsummer ...

William Shakespeare - 1826
...maintain'd, Upon the instant that she was accus'd, Shall be lamented, pitied and excus'd, Of every hearer : For it so falls out, That what we have we prize not...enjoy it; but being lack'd and lost, Why, then we rack16 the value; then we find The virtue, that possession would not show us Whiles it was ours :—...
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The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text by G. Steevens ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1826
...maintain'd, Upon the instant that she was accus'd, Shall be lamented, pitied and excus'd, Of every hearer : For it so falls out, That what we have we prize not...worth, Whiles we enjoy it ; but being lack'd and lost, WTiy, then we rack the value3 ; then we find The virtue, that possession would not show us Whiles it...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 32

Kenneth Muir - 2002 - 276 pages
...maintained, Upon the instant that she was accused, Shall be lamented, pitied, and excused Of every hearer. For it so falls out, That what we have we prize not to the worth Whiles we enjoy it; but being lacked and lost, Why, then we rack the value, then we find The virtue that possession would not show...
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Dizionario comparato di proverbi e modi proverbiali italiani, latini ...

Augusto Arthaber - 1972 - 892 pages
...of a thing is best Juiowu by thé want of it. That what we hâve we prize not to thé worth Wliilrs we enjoy it; but being lack'd and lost Why, then we rack thè value. (SHAKESPEARE, Much ado about nMing, IV. i) gr. - 01 y*P xaxol yvwfiatoi, Taya^ov xeP°'-v...
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Broken Nuptials in Shakespeare's Plays

Carol Thomas Neely - 1985 - 261 pages
...All's Well That Ends Well, Hamlet, Othello, Antony and Cleopatra, Cymbeline, and The Winter's Tale. For it so falls out That what we have we prize not to the worth Whiles we enjoy it; but being lacked and lost, Why then we rack the value, then we find The virtue that possession would not show...
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Melville and the Politics of Identity: From King Lear to Moby-Dick

Julian Markels - 1993 - 164 pages
...marked passages that reveal our mere giddiness. Also in Much Ado, he side-lined the Friar's words, for it so falls out That what we have we prize not to the worth While we enjoy it, but being lack'd and lost, Why, then we rack the value, then we find The virtue...
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Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volume 1

Emanuel Strauss - 1994 - 625 pages
...valued b) a good tree cannot bring forth evil fruit c) blessings are not valued till they are gone d) that what we have we prize not to the worth whiles we enjoy it e) the cow knows not what her tail is worth until she has lost it f ) the worth of a thing is best...
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Intercultural Interactions: A Practical Guide

Kenneth Cushner, Richard W. Brislin - 1996 - 365 pages
...lifetime of exposure to the bureaucracies of the host country. VALUES: THE INTEGRATING FORCE IN CULTURE For it so falls out That what we have we prize not to the worth Whiles we enjoy it, but being lacked and lost. Why then we rack the value. — William Shakespeare, Much Ado Abaut Nothing I value...
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