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" Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off... "
Macbeth. King John - Page 27
by William Shakespeare - 1788
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Macbeth

William Shakespeare - 2005 - 210 pages
...confusions, and a force neither divine nor wicked seems to choose him as the trumpet of its prophecy: Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek,...great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking off, And pity, like a naked newborn babe...
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Charting Shakespearean Waters: Text and Theatre

Sos Haugaard - 2005 - 164 pages
...towards the murder. Importantly this speech contains a vision of angels and of the heavens opening: Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek,...great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued against The deep damnation of his taking-off, And pity, like a naked new-born babe,...
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Shakespeare Reproduced: The Text in History and Ideology

Jean E. Howard, Marion F. O'Connor - 2005 - 292 pages
...by Duncan's furthering of their designs; in soliloquy, he produces the saintly king - as a mirror. "This Duncan / Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath...office, that his virtues / Will plead like angels" (I. vii. 16-19). Duncan's polished surface: is it the representation of an absolute power or the mirror...
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Focus on Macbeth

John Russell Brown - 2005 - 272 pages
...of goodness, the force of which Macbeth recognises and takes into his calculation: Duncan Hath bonie his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great...his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongu'd. (I.vii.16-19) This prophecy is taken up in the later scenes of the play as the 'powers' (the word nearly...
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Themes and Variations in Shakespeare's Sonnets

J. B. Leishman - 2004 - 254 pages
...outbursts of Lear, and where but in Aeschylus do we find such metaphors as those in Macbeth's speech about pity, like a naked new-born babe Striding the blast,...cherubin hors'd Upon the sightless couriers of the air? But that is 'matter for another tale'. Was Shakespeare familiar with Horace's Odes? I can see no way...
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X-Kit Literature Series: FET Macbeth

2005 - 60 pages
...Strong both against the deed: then, as his host, 75 Who should against his murderer shut the door, Not bear the knife myself. Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear is his great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against 20 The deep...
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Patterns in Shakespearian Tragedy

Irving Ribner - 2005 - 224 pages
...subject, Strong both against the deed; then, as his host, Who should against his murderer shut the door, Not bear the knife myself. Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been 1 G. Wilson Knight, The Imperial Theme , pp. 125-55; LC Knights, 'How Many Children Had Lady Macbeth?"...
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The Yale Book of Quotations

Fred R. Shapiro, Associate Librarian and Lecturer in Legal Research Fred R Shapiro - 2006 - 1067 pages
...Justice Commends th'ingredience of our poison'd To our own lips. Macbeth act 1, sc. 7, 1. 10 (1606) 342 肀 D 0 Macbeth act 1, sc. 7, 1. 16 (1606) 343 I have no spur To prick the sides of my intent, but only Vaulting...
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The Essential Wayne Booth

Wayne C. Booth - 2006 - 375 pages
...subject, Strong both against the deed; then, as his host, Who should against murderer shut the door, Not bear the knife myself. Besides, this Duncan Hath...great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off . . . In this speech we see again Shakespeare's...
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What Good are the Arts?

John Carey - 2006 - 286 pages
...Macbeth's soliloquy when he is contemplating whether to murder King Duncan, and fears the consequences. Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek,...great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off; And Pity, like a naked new-born babe,...
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