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" I have almost forgot the taste of fears : The time has been, my senses would have cool'd To hear a night-shriek ; and my fell of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir As life were in't : I have supp'd full with horrors ; Direness, familiar to... "
Miscellaneous Prose Works - Page 171
by Walter Scott - 1853
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With a Life of the Poet, and ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...the taste of fears. The time has been, my senses would have cooled To hear a night-shriek ; and my fell of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse, and stir As life were in't. I have supped full with horrors; Direness, familiar to my slaught'rous thoughts, Cannot once start...
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The Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1852
...taste of fears : The time has been, my senses would have cpol'd To hear a night-shriek; and my fellf of hair "Would at a dismal treatise rouse, and stir As life were in't : I have supp'd full with horrors ; Direness, familiar to my slaught'rous thoughts, Cannot once start...
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Studies from the English poets

George Frederick Graham - 1852 - 519 pages
...taste of fears : The time has been, my senses would have cooled To hear a night-shriek ; and my fell1 of hair Would, at a dismal treatise, rouse, and stir As life were in it : I have supped full with horrors ; Direness, familiar to my slaughterous thoughts, Cannot once...
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Dictionary of Shakespearian Quotations: Exhibiting the Most Forcible ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 418 pages
...very taste of fears : The time has been my senses would have cool'd To hear a night-shriek ; and my fell of hair Would, at a dismal treatise, rouse, and stir, As life were in't : I have supp'd full of horrors ; Direness, familiar to my slaughterous thoughts, Cannot once start...
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The plays of Shakspere, carefully revised [by J.O.] with a ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1853
...the taste of fears : The time has been, my senses would have cooled To hear a night-shriek ; and my fell of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse, and stir As life were in : I have supped full with horrors; Direness, familiar to my slaughterous thoughts, Cannot once...
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SKETCHES OF THE IRISH BAR

SKETCHES OF THE IRISH BAR BY THE RT. HON. RICHARD LALOR SHEIL, M.P. - 1854
...the most awful character divests them of the power of producing effect, and that they 11 Whose fell of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir As life were in't" acquire sucli a familiarity with direness, that they become not only insensible to the dreadful nature...
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The Miscellaneous Works, Volume 2

William Hazlitt - 1854
...wild beasts or " bandit fierce," or to the unmitigated fury of the elements. The time has been that " our fell of hair would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir as life were in it" But the police spoils all ; and we now hardly so much as dream of a midnight murder. Macbeth...
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The advanced prose and poetical reader, by A.W. Buchan

Alexander Winton Buchan - 1854
...the taste of fears. The time has been, my senses would have cool'd To hear a night-shriek ; and my fell of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse, and stir As life were in't : I have supp'd full with horrors ; Direness, familiar to my slaught'rous thoughts, Cannot once start...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - 1854
...taste of fears : The time has been, my senses would have cool'd To hear a night-shriek ; and my fell1 of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse, and stir As life were in't : I have supp'd full with horrors j Direness, familiar to my slaught'rous thoughts, Cannot once start...
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Sketches of the Irish Bar, Volume 2

Richard Lalor Sheil - 1854
...of the most awful character divests them of the power of producing effect, and that they " Whose fell of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir As life were in V acquire such a familiarity with direness, that they become not only insensible to the dreadful...
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