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" I have almost forgot the taste of fears : The time has been, my senses would have cool'd To hear a night-shriek ; and my fell of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir As life were in't : I have supp'd full with horrors ; Direness, familiar to... "
Miscellaneous Prose Works - Page 171
by Walter Scott - 1853
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1813
...the taste of fears: The time has been, my senses would have cool'd To hear a night shriek : and my fell of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse, and stir As life were in't : I have supp'd full with horrors; Direuess, familiar to my slaught'rons thoughts, Cannot once start...
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Shakspeare's himself again; or the language of the poet asserted

Andrew Becket - 1815
...was so fond. B. Macb. The time has been, my senses would have cool'd To hear a night-shriek ; and my fell of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse, and stir As life were in't. Fell of hair. "My hairy part, my capillitium. Fell is skin. JOHN. " Fell of hair." Fell is likewise...
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Blackwood's Magazine, Volume 74

1853
...lines where Macbeth says " The time has been my senses would have To hear a night-shriek ; and my fell of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir As life were in*t." " My senses would have cooled" that is, my nerves would have thrilled witli an icy shudder. The...
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Macbeth, and King Richard the Third: An Essay, in Answer to Remarks on Some ...

John Philip Kemble - 1817 - 171 pages
...him, when he owns* The time has been, my senses would have cool'd To hear a night-shriek ; and my fell of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse, and stir As life were in'tf Had the author of the Remarks * Remarks, p. 49. t Macbeth, Act v. Sc. S. quoted the whole speech...
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The Family Shakspeare: In Ten Volumes; in which Nothing is Added ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1818
...taste of fears : The time has been, my senses would have cool'd To hear a night- shriek ; and my fell 3 of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse, and stir As life were in't : I have supp'd full with horrors ; Direncss, familiar to my slaught'rous thoughts, Cannot once start...
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Lectures on the English Poets: Delivered at the Surrey Institution

William Hazlitt - 1818 - 331 pages
...beasts or " bandit fierce," or to the unmitigated fury of the elements. The time has been that " erar fell of hair would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir as life were in it." But the police spoils all ; and we now hardly so much as dream of a midnight murder. Macbeth...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: To which are Added His ...

William Shakespeare - 1821
...the taste of fears : The time has been, my senses would have cool'd To hear a njght-shriek ; and my fell* of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse, and stir As life were in't : I have supp'd full with horrors ; Direness^ familiar to my slaught'rous thoughts, Cannot once start...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare, Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1821
...those very hairs, as if they had life, start up, &c. POPE. So, in Macbeth : " The time has been " my fell of hair, " Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir, " As life were in't." MALONE. Not only the hair of animals having neither life nor sensation was called an excrement, but...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare, Volume 7

William Shakespeare, James Boswell, Alexander Pope, Richard Farmer, Samuel Johnson, Edward Capell, George Steevens, Nicholas Rowe - 1821
...those very hairs, as if they had life, start up, &c. POPE. So, in Macbeth : " The time has been my fell of hair, " Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir, " As life were in'l." MALONE. Not only the hair of animals having neither life nor sensation was called an excrement,...
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The New monthly magazine and universal register. [Continued as ..., Volume 23

...the most awful character divests them of the power of producing effect, and that they " Whose fall of hair Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir As life were in't," acquire such a familiarity with direness, that they become not only insensible to the dreadful nature...
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