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ADV E N T U R E S

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ROBINSON CRUSOE;
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The Second and Last Part

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of his

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· Aml of the Strange Surprizing Account of bis

T R A V E L S
Round three parts of the Globe.
Written by Himself

VOL.11.

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Τ Η Ε

P R E F A CE.

TH

HE success the former part of this WORK

has met with in the world, has yet been no other than is acknowledged to be due to the surprising variety of the subjeci, , and to the agreeable manner of the performance.

All the endeavours of envious people to reproach it with being a romance, to search it for errors in geography, inconsistency in the relation, and contradictions in the fact, have proved abortive, and as impotent as malicious.

The just application of every incident, the religious and useful inferences drawn from every part, are so many testimonies to the good design of making it public, and must legitimate all the part that may be called invention or parable in the story. VOL. II. A

The

The Second Part, if the Editor's opinion
may pass, is (contrary to the usage of Second
Parts) every way as entertaining as the First;
contains as strange and surprising incidents,
and as great a variety of them; nor is the
application less serious or suitable; and doubt-
less will, to the sober, as well as the ingenious
READER, be every way as profitable and di-
verting; and this makes the abridging this
WORK as scandalous, as it is knavish and ridi-
culous. Seeing, to shorten the Book, that they
may seem to reduce the value, they strip it of
all those reflections, as well religious as moral,
which are not only the greatest beauties of the
WORK, but are calculated for the infinite ad-
vantage of the READER.

By this, they leave the Work naked of its
brightest ornaments; and yet they would (at
the same time they pretend that the Author
has supplied his story out of his invention)
take from it the improvement, which alone
recommends that invention to wife and good

men.

The injury these men do to the PROPRI-
ÉTORS of Works, is a practice all honest

men abhor; and they believe they may challenge them to shew the difference between that and robbing on the highway, or breaking open a house.

If they cannot shew any difference in the crime, they will find it hard to fhew why there should be any difference in the punishment.

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