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eral sense of the army, as well as our own particular opinion, that
this State in a resolve of the General Court, has promised to make
good to them “the wages of the establishment of Congress, where-
on they engaged,” or in other words to indemnify this State's quo-
ta, for every loss they have sustained in their wages, by means of
the depreciation of the continental currency; and unless they are
valued by the rate of depreciation, at the time when the general
payments were actually made, it is evident their wages will not be
made good, and consequently the resolve not complied with; and
as this claim was early stated by us, even a considerable time be-
fore the monthly rate of depreciation was settled, and as the justice
of it both before and since has been fully conceded to on your part;
we cannot then see with what propriety it is now rejected, except
the General Court has, unknown to us, passed a new resolve, and
that it is their final determination to make good our pay only in
part. If this be the case, gentlemen, we would wish to be informed
of it, as it will place the matter in a point of view, upon wbich we
are not authorised to act, our business being to negotiate a settle-
ment for the whole balance due, on account of the failure of the
currency, which we conceive to be fully promised us in the resolve
of February last; if we are not to proceed upon this footing, we
hope to be enabled as soon as possible to give our constituents the
necessary information, that they may no longer labor under the mis-
take of haring their pay made good, by this State, when no such
thing is intended.
We are, Gentlemen, your obedient and very humble servants.

JOHN POPKINS,
TOBIAS FERNALD,
WILLIAM HULL, } Committee.
SIMON LARNED,

BENJAMIN HEYWOOD, Two days after the foregoing letters were sent, the committee from the line received a letter from the committee of Court, inclosing a letter from them to the Council, and an order of Council in consequence of that letter. Letter from the Committee of Court.

Boston, JANUARY 31, 1780. GENTLEMEN—The letter received from you on Saturday last we have laid before the Hon. Council of this State ; we herewith inclose you a copy of our letter to them, requesting their consideration and advice thereon, also a copy of the order of Council on the same, which we think will be sufficient to convince you that it is

not in the power of the committee, to make any consideration in the settlement with the army, for the delay of their monthly pay. We are, Gentlemen, your Most Humble Servants.

SAMUEL Austin, Per order. To the Committee from the Army.

Order of the Council. Council Chamber, Boston 29:h, Jan, 1780. Ordered that the committee appointed to settle with the army be and hereby are informed, !hat their letter and the letter to them, from the committee from the army, have been considered by this Board, and as the same letters relate only to the question, we have already with mature deliberation advised you upon, can only add, that should the Gentlemen on the part of the army, cause a delay of settlement upon the generous plan laid by the General Assembly, they alone must hazard the consequences, and the world will judge of the rectitude of the General Assembly of the State of Massachusetts Bay, in their endeavor to do justice, to their quota of the Continental army. A true copy, Attest,

John Avery, D. Secretary. Letter from the Court's Committee to council, which should have been inserted previous to the above order which was in consequence of the foregoing letters.

To the Honorable Council. GENTLEMEN—The enclosed letter we have this day received from the Committee of the army, expressing their dissatisfaction with the Resolution of the Honorable Board, not allowing the delay of their monthly pay to be taken into consideration, by the Court's Committee in settling with the army; we therefore beg leave to lay the same before the Honorable Board, for their consideration and further advice.

SAMUEL Austin, Per order. Boston, 26th Jan. 1780. Letter from the Committee of the Line to the Court's Committee in consequence of the foregoing letters and order of Council.

Boston, 3d Feb. 1780. GENTLEMEN—We have received your Letter of the 31st January, inclosing your Letter to the Honorable Council together with their advice respecting our claim of considering the pay wbich the army have received, as valuable according to the rate of depreciation, at the time when the general payments were made.

eral sense of the army, as well as our own particular opinion, that
this State in a resolve of the General Court, has promised to make
good to them the wages of the establishment of Congress, where-
on they engaged,” or in other words to indemnify this State's quo-
ta, for every loss they have sustained in their wages, by means of
the depreciation of the continental currency; and unless they are
valued by the rate of depreciation, at the time when the general
payments were actually made, it is evident their wages will not be
made good, and consequently the resolve not complied with; and
as this claim was early stated by us, even a considerable time be-
fore the monthly rate of depreciation was settled, and as the justice
of it both before and since has been fully conceded to on your part;
we cannot then see with what propriety it is now rejected, except
the General Court has, unknown to us, passed a new resolve, and
that it is their final determination to make good our pay only in
part. If this be the case, gentlemen, we would wish to be informed
of it, as it will place the matter in a point of view, upon wbich we
are not authorised to act, our business being to negotiate a settle-
ment for the whole balance due, on account of the failure of the
currency, which we conceive to be fully promised us in the resolve
of February last ; if we are not to proceed upon this footing, we
hope to be enabled as soon as possible to give our constituents the
necessary information, that they may no longer labor under the mis-
take of having their pay made good, by this State, when no such
thing is intended.
We are, Gentlemen, your obedient and very humble servants.

JOHN POPKINS,
TOBIAS FERNALD,
WILLIAM HULL, } Committee.
SIMON LARNED,

BENJAMIN HEYWOOD, J. Two days after the foregoing letters were sent, the committee from the line received a letter from the committee of Court, inclosing a letter from them to the Council, and an order of Council in consequence of that letter. Letter from the Committee of Court.

Boston, JANUARY 31, 1780. GENTLEMEN—The letter received from you on Saturday last we have laid before the Hon. Council of this State ; we herewith inclose you a copy of our letter to them, requesting their consideration and advice thereon, also a copy of the order of Council on the same, which we think will be sufficient to convince you that it is

HISTORY OF THE COUNTY OF WORCESTER. .

STERLING. BOUNDARIES.—This town is bounded on the North by Leominster, East by Lancaster, South by Boylston and West Boylston, and West by Holden and Princeton. Its Indian name was Chocksett, and it was formerly the West Parish in Lancaster until 1781, when it was incorporated by its present name.'

LAND Titles.—The territory now constituting Sterling, was derived from three original grants.

1. The Mile_So called, is a strip of land on the easterly side of the township extending the whole length of the town; it is about a mile in width, and was included in the first original grant of Nashuah townsbip, (now Lancaster) made in 1643, which was purchased of Sholan the Sachem of the Nashuoggs, and confirmed by the General Court at or about the period above damed.

It was annexed to the West Parish in Lancaster, at its incorporation about the year 1744.

II. A principal part of the town is contained in the new or additional grant purchased from a nephew of Sholan in 1701 ; but on account of the Indian war, called Queen Ann's war, which broke out soon after the Indian purchase, it was not confirmed by the General Court until 1713. This grant included Leominster also, and a part of West Boylston, with a small tract of Boylston.

III. The Leg So called, was originally a part of Shrewsbury, and was granted by the General Court, Nov. 2, 1717, with the rest of that town.

This tract was annexed to Lancaster, (then including Sterling,) by an act of the Legislature passed Feb. 27, 1768.* It was then three miles in length and about one and a half in breadth. About one third of it was set off from Sterling in 1808 to West Boylstop. In the act setting this tract of land from Shrewsbury to Lancaster, no provision is made for the support of those paupers who bad gained a settlement there previous to the annexation.

* See Vol. of Laws for 1768 in the Secretary's Office, page 543. All that part of Shrewsbury Leg, bounded South on Quinpepoxet river, West on Hol. den line, North on Princeton line, and East on Still water river, is hereby set to Lancaster, and the Inhabitants dwelling on said land, shall there do daties, and receive privileges as other town inhabitants.

+It received its name from its shape-Narrow gores of lands annexed to particular towns, often received this appellation. Thus we find Royalston Leg and Stow Leg.

Further notice will be to be taken of the mile and the leg in the histories of Lancaster and Shrewsbury.

The following is a Copy of the Indian deed of the New Grant.

“ The bargain with George Tahanto, and other Indians, for lands of them purchased.

.. “Know all men by these presents that I, George Tahanto, Indian Sagamore, for and in consideration of what money, namely, twelve pounds was formerly paid to Sholan, my Uncle, sometime Sagamore of Nashuah, for the purchase of said township and also forty-six shillings formerly paid by Insigne John Moore and John Houghton of said Nashuah to James Wiser, alias Quenepenitt, now deceased, but especially for and in consideration of eighteen pounds paid part, and the rest secured to be paid, by John Houghton and Nathaniel Wilder, their heirs, executors and assigns forever, a certain tract of land on the West side of the westward line of Nashuah township, adjoining to said line, and butts southerly for the most part on Nashuah river, bearing westerly towards Wachusett Hills, and runs northerly as far as Nashuah township, and which lands and meadows, be it more or less, to be to the said Insigne John Mooer, Jobo Houghton and Nathaniel Wilder, their heirs and assigns, to have and to hold forever. And I, the said George Tabanto do bereby promise and engage to procure an order from the honored General Court, for their allowance and confirmation of the sale of said lands as aforesaid, and also that I will shew and mark out the bounds of said land in convenient time, not exceeding four months, and also to make such deeds and conveyances, as may be necessary for the confirmation of the premises, and also that I the said George Tahanto do by these presents fully ratify and confirm, all and every, the said township of Nashuah, alias Lancaster, to the Inhabitants and Proprietors thereof according as it was formerly granted to them or their ancestors by my Uncle Sliolan and laid out to them by Ensign Thomas Noyes and confirmed by the Hon. General Court. For the performance of all the abovesaid, I the said George Tahanto have set my hand and seal this twenty-sixth day of June in the 13th year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord William the third, over England &c. King, Annoque Domini 1701.

GEORGE TAHANTO, his O mark.
MARY AUNSOCAMUG, her ) mark.
Signed and sealed in presence of

JOHN WONSQUON, his ) ark.
JOHN AQUITTICUS, his' I mark.
PETER PUCKATAUGH, his P mark.
JONATHAN WILDER.
JOHN GUILD."

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