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Except wind stands as never it stood,
It is an ill wind that turns none to good.

Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry.
Ill blows the wind that profits nobody.

Shakespeare, Henry VI., Pt. III, 5.
Ill wind which blows no man good.

Shakespeare, Henry IV., Pt. II, 3

Also, Heywood's Proverbs.

'Tis merry in hall
When beards wag all.

August's Abstract.
Merry swithe it is in halle
When the beards waveth alle.

Adam Davie, 1312, Life of Alexander.

Naught venture, naught have,

October's Abstract.

Look ere thou leap, see cre thou go.

Of Wiving and Thriving.
Look before you leap,

Butler's Hudibras, Part II, Canto 2, L. 502.

SIR EDWARD DYER.

1540_1607.

My mind to me a kingdom is;

Such present joys therein I find, That it excels all other bliss,

That earth affords or grows by kind:
Though much I want which most would have,
Yet still my mind forbids to crave.

Courtly Poets.
Mens regnum bona possidet.

Seneca, Thyestes.

My mind to me a kingdom is;

Such perfect joy therein I find,
As far exceeds all earthly bliss,

That God and Nature hath assigned.
Though much I want that most would have,
Yet still my mind forbids to crave.

Byrd's Psalmes, Sonnets, etc., 1588

My mind to me an empire is,
While grace affordeth health.

Robert Southwell (1560—1595), Look Home. BISHOP JOHN STILL.

1543—1607.

I cannot eat but little meat,

My stomach is not good;
But sure I think that I can drink
With him that wears a hood.

Gammer Gurton's Needle.

SIR EDWARD COKE.

1549—1634.

The gladsome light of jurisprudence.

First Institute.

Reason is the life of the law; nay, the common law itself is nothing else but reason. The law, which is the perfection of reason.

First Institute.

*

*

Let us consider the reason of the case. For nothing is law that is not reason. -Sir John Powell, Coggs vs. Bernard.

The house of every one is to him as his castle and fortress, as well for his defense against injury and violence, as for repose.

Semayne's Case.

They (corporations) cannot commit treason, nor be outlawed, nor be excommunicate for they have no souls.

-Case of Sutton's Hospital.

MIGUEL DE CERVANTES.

1547—1616.

Too much of a good thing.

Don Quixote, Pt. I, Book 1, Ch. 6.
He had a face like a benediction

Book II, Ch. 4.
Every one is the son of his own works.

Book IV, Ch. 20.

Blessings on him who invented sleep, the mantle that covers all human thoughts, the food that appeases hunger, the drink that quenches thirst, the fire that warms cold, the cold that moderates heat, and, lastly, the general coin that purchases all things, the balance and weight that equals the shepherd, with the king, and the simple with the wise. -Pt. II, Book IV., Ch. 16.

My heart is wax to be moulded as she pleases, but enduring as marble to retain.The Little Gypsy. (Le Gitanilla.)

Except wind stands as never it stood,
It is an ill wind that turns none to good.

Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry. 111 blows the wind that profits nobody.

Shakespeare, Henry VI., Pt. III, 5.
Ill wind which blows no man good.

Shakespeare, Henry IV., Pt. II, 3

Also, Heywood's Proverbs.

'Tis merry in hall
When beards wag all.

August's Abstract.
Merry swithe it is in halle
When the beards waveth alle.

Adam Davie, 1312, Life of Alexander.

Naught venture, naught have,

October's Abstract.

Look ere thou leap, see cre thou go.

Of Wiving and Thriving.
Look before you leap,

Butler's Hudibras, Part II, Canto 2, L. 502.

SIR EDWARD DYER.

1540—1607.

My mind to me a kingdom is;

Such present joys therein I find, That it excels all other bliss,

That earth affords or grows by kind : Though much I want which most would have, Yet still my mind forbids to crave.

Courtly Poets.

Mens regnum bona possidet.

Seneca, Thyestes.

My mind to me a kingdom is;

Such perfect joy therein I find,
As far exceeds all earthly bliss,

That God and Nature hath assigned.
Though much I want that most would have,
Yet still my mind forbids to crave.

Byrd's Psalmes, Sonnets, etc., 1588.

My mind to me an empire is,
While grace affordeth health.

Robert Southwell (1560—1595), Look Home. BISHOP JOHN STILL.

1543—1607.

I cannot eat but little meat,

My stomach is not good;
But sure I think that I can drink
With him that wears a hood.

Gammer Gurton's Needle.

SIR EDWARD COKE.

1549–1634.

The gladsome light of jurisprudence.

First Institute.

Reason is the life of the law; nay, the common law itself is nothing else but reason. * The law, which is the perfection of reason.

First Institute.

Let us consider the reason of the case. For nothing is law that is not reason. —Sir John Powell, Coggs vs. Bernard.

The house of every one is to him as his castle and fortress, as well for his defense against injury and violence, as for repose.

Semayne's Case.

They (corporations) cannot commit treason, nor be outlawed, nor be excommunicate for they have no souls.

-Case of Sutton's Hospital.

MIGUEL DE CERVANTES.

1547-1616.

Too much of a good thing.

Don Quixote, Pt. I, Book 1, Ch. 6.
He had a face like a benediction

Book II, Ch. 4.
Every one is the son of his own works.

Book IV, Ch. 20.

Blessings on him who invented sleep, the mantle that covers all human thoughts, the food that appeases hunger, the drink that quenches thirst, the fire that warms cold, the cold that moderates heat, and, lastly, the general coin that purchases all things, the balance and weight that equals the shepherd with the king, and the simple with the wise. -Pt. II, Book IV., Ch. 16.

My heart is wax to be moulded as she pleases, but enduring as marble to retain.— The Little Gypsy. (Le Gitanilla.)

EDMUND SPENSER.

1553-1599.

The noblest mind the best contentment has.

Faerie Queen, Book I, Canto I, St. I.
Aye me, how many perils doe enfold
The righteous man, to make him daily fall.

Book I, Canto VIII, St. I.
Ay me! what perils do environ
The man that meddles with cold iron.

Butler's Hudibras, Pt. I.
Her berth was of the wombe of morning dew,
And her conception of the joyous prime.

Book III, Canto VI, Stanza 3.
The dew of thy birth is of the womb of the morning.

Common Prayer, Psalm CX, 3.
Dan Chaucer, well of English undefyled,
On fame's eternal beadroll worthie to be fyled.

Book IV, Canto II, St. 32.
Who will not mercie unto others show,
How can he mercy ever hope to have?

Book VI, Canto I, St. 42.
For of the soul the body form doth take,
For soul is form, and doth the body make.

Hymns in Honor of Beauty, Line 132.

SIR WALTER RALEIGH.

1552–1618.

If all the world and love were young,
And truth in every shepherd's tongue,
These pretty pleasures might me move
To live with thee, and be thy love.

The Nymph's Reply to the Passionate Shepherd.
Passions are likened best to floods and streams;
The shallow murmur, but the deep are dumb.

The Silent Lover.

O eloquent, just and mightie Death! whom none could advise, thou hast perswaded; what none hath dared, thou hast done; and whom all the world hath flattered, thou only hast cast out of the world and despised; hast drawne together all the farre stretched greatnesse, all the pride, crueltie, and ambition of man, and covered it all over with these two narrow words, Hic jacet !

Historie of the World, Book V, Pt. I.
Even such is time, that takes on trust
Our youth, our joyes, our all we have,
And pays us but with age and dust;
Who in the dark and silent grave,

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