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WHO-WHEN-WHERE SERIES-I.

NOTE.—The “Who-When-Where" series covers the most familiar sayings of the earlier writers, commencing with Chaucer (b. 1328) and extending to and including Milton, (b. 1608). The 17th century will be represented under “ Best Thoughts of that Century."

GEOFFREY CHAUCER.

13281400.

Whanne that April with his shoures swote
The droughte of March hath perced to the rote.

Canterbury Tales, Prologue, Line 1.

And smale foules maken melodie
That slepen alle night with open eye,
So priketh hem nature in hir corages;
Than longen folke to gon on pilgrimages.

Line 9.

He was a very parfit gentil knight.

Line 72.

He coude songes make and well endite.

Line 95.

Ful wel she sange the service devine,
Entuned in hire nose ful swetely;
And Frenche she spake ful fayre and fetisly,
After the scole of Stratteford atte bowe,
For Frenche of Paris was to hire unknowe.

Line 122.
For him was lever han at his beddes hed
A twenty bookes, clothed in black or red,
Of Aristotle, and his philosophie,
Than robes riche, or fidel, or sautrie.
But all be that he was a philosophre,
Yet hadde he but litel gold in cofre.

Line 295.
Cristes lore, and his apostles twelve,
He taught, but first he folwed it himselve.

Line 529.
And yet he had a thomb of gold parde.

Line 565.
(In allusion to the proverb, "Every honest miller
has a golder. thumb.")

In this connection similar statistics concerning graduates of Princeton are published. They show that of 250 graduates in 1895, only 107, or 43 per cent, were married. They had seventy-four children, the offspring being but 70 per cent of the married men. Of one Yale class graduated twenty-five years ago it is found that 81.6 per cent are married and the 102 married men had 235 children, which is a trifle better than was done by the Harvard and Princeton graduates.

Whether the number of the children of these college men is below the average of other American families, President Eliot appears to think there is a cause for the failure of the Harvard graduates to have a larger number of offspring He says it takes too long for a man to get an education now. The professional man nowadays, he says, is fortunate if he completes his education and is in a position to marry before he is twenty-eight or twenty-nine years old. He thinks young men should marry at twenty-six, and to make earlier marriages possible he would have the school course end at seventeen or eighteen, the college course at twenty or twentyone, and the professional course at twenty-four or twentyfive.

It appears from this that, though Dr. Eliot deems education important, he regards marriage of more importance, if the race of Americans is not to run out.-Cleveland Leader.

INJUSTICE

“Do you agree with the scientists who declare that the inhabitants of this continent will in time take on the characteristics of the American Indians ?

Certainly not. It would be distinctly unfair to judge any country by its college yells.”—Washington Post.

WHO-WHEN-WHERE SERIES-I.

NOTE.—The “Who-When-Where " series covers the most familiar sayings of the earlier writers, commencing with Chaucer (b. 1328) and extending to and including Milton, (b. 1608). The 17th century will be represented under “ Best Thoughts of that Century."

GEOFFREY CHAUCER.

1328-1400.

Whanne that April with his shoures swote
The droughte of March hath perced to the rote.

Canterbury Tales, Prologue, Line 1.

And smale foules maken melodie
That slepen alle night with open eye,
So priketh hem nature in hir corages;
Than longen folke to gon on pilgrimages.

Line 9.

He was a very parfit gentil knight.

Line 72.

He coude songes make and well endite.

Line 95.

Ful wel she sange the service devine,
Entuned in hire nose ful swetely;
And Frenche she spake ful fayre and fetisly,
After the scole of Stratteford atte bowe,
For Frenche of Paris was to hire unknowe.

Line 122.
For him was lever han at his beddes hed
A twenty bookes, clothed in black or red,
Of Aristotle, and his philosophie,
Than robes riche, or fidel, or sautrie.
But all be that he was a philosophre,
Yet hadde he but litel gold in cofre.

Line 295.

But Cristes lore, and his apostles twelve,
He taught, but first he folwed it himselve.

Line 529.

And yet he had a thomb of gold parde.

Line 565.
(In allusion to the proverb, “Every honest miller
has a golder thumb.")

Who so shall telle a tale after a man,
He moste reherse, as neighe as ever he can,
Everich word, if it be in his charge,
All speke he never so rudely and so large;
Or elles he moste tellen his tale untrewe,
Or feinen thinges, or finden wordes newe.

Line 733-
For May wol have no slogardie a-night.
The seson priketh every gentil herte,
And maketh him out of his slepe to sterte.

The Knight's Tale, Line 1044
Up rose the sonne, and up rose Emilie.

Line 2275.

To maken vertue of necessite.

Line 3044

So was hire joly whistle ywette.

The Reve's Tale, Line 4153.

And so to see, and eek for to be seye.

The Wif of Bathes Prologue. Line 6134. (Spectatum veniunt, veniunt spectentur ut ipsae.

Ovid, Art of Love, 1, 99.)

That he is gentil that doth gentil dedis.

Line 6752.

Truth is the highest thing that man may keep.

The Frankeleine's Tale. Line 11789.

The firste vertue, sone, if thou wilt lere,
Is to restreine, and kepen wel thy tonge.

The Manciple's Tale, Line 17281.

For of fortunes sharpe adversite,
The worst kind of infortune is this,
A man that hath been in prosperite,
And it remembered, when it passed is.

Troilus and Creseide, Book III, Line 1625.
One eare it heard, at the other out it went.

Book IV, Line 435.

For out of the old fieldes, as men saithe,
Cometh all this new corne fro yere to yere,
And out of old bookes, in good faithe,
Cometh al this new science that men lere.

The Assembly of Foules, Line 22.

Of all the floures in the mede,
Than love I most these floures white and rede,
Soch that men callen daisies in our toun.

The Legend of Good Women, Line 41.

THOMAS A KEMPIS.

1380—1471.

Man proposes, but God disposes.

Imitation of Christ, Book I, Chap. 19.

That this expression is of much greater antiquity, is shown by the Cronicle of Battle Abbey, P. 27; and also by Piers Ploughman's Vision, Line 13994.

Also, note Proverbs XIV. 9. “A man's heart deviseth his way; but the Lord directeth his steps."

And when he is out of sight, quickly also is he out of mind.

Book I, Chap. 23.
Out of syght, out of mynd,

Googe's Eglogs, Epytaphes, and Sonnets, 1563.
And out of mind as out of sight.

Lord Brooke, Sonnet LVI.
Fer from eze, fer from herte,
Quoth Hendyng.

Hendyng's Proverbs, MSS. 1320.

The Devil was sick, the Devil a monk would be;
The Devil was well, the Devil a monk was he.

Book IV., Chap. 24.

THOMAS TUSSER.

1523—1580.

Time tries the troth in everything.

The Author's Epistle, Ch. 1. God sendeth and giveth, both mouth and the meat.

Good Husbandry Lessons. For buying or selling of pig in a poke.

September's Abstract.
The stone that is rolling can gather no moss.

Good Husbandry Lessons.
A rowling stone gathers no moss.

Gosson's Ephemerides of Phialo.
Better late than never.

An Habitation Enforced. This expression is also found in Heywood's Proverbs, in Bunyan's Pilgrims, and in Murphy's, The School

for Guardians. At Christmas play and make good cheer, For Christmas comes but once a year.

The Farmer's Daily Diet.

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