Imperialism And Music: Britain 1876-1953

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Manchester University Press, 2001 - 534 pages
This is the first book to consider the relationship between British imperialism and music. With its unique ability to stimulate the emotions and to create mental images, music was used to dramatize, illustrate, and reinforce the components of the ideological cluster that constituted British imperialism in its heyday: patriotism, monarchism, hero-worship, Protestantism, racialism, and chivalry. It was also used to emphasize the inclusiveness of Britain by stressing the contributions of England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland to the imperial project.
 

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Contents

Sullivans Empire
41
coronations and jubilees
88
Armistice Day and Empire
152
exhibitions and festivals
177
the Aldershot Tattoo
211
opera operetta and ballet
248
music for imperial films sun never
279
Sing a song of Empire
324
From Greenlands icy mountains from Indias coral
366
Imperial march
411
the dominions musical tour
450
Dame Emma Albani
469
Peter Dawson
495
Conclusion
525
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About the author (2001)

Jeffrey Richards is Professor of Cultural History at Lancaster University.

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