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§ 7276. (R. S. § 3868.) Receiving-boxes.

The Postmaster-General may establish, in places where letter-carriers are employed, and in other places where, in his judgment, the public convenience requires it, receiving-boxes for the deposit of mail-matter, and shall cause the matter deposited therein to be collected as often as public convenience may require.

Act June 8, 1872, c. 335, $ 95, 17 Stat. 296.

Provisions relating to receiving-boxes in buildings and chutes as parts of such boxes were made by Act March 3, 1887, c. 388, § 1, as amended by

Act Jan. 23, 1893, c. 41, post, $ 7277. § 7277. (Act March 3, 1887, c. 388, § 1, as amended, Act Jan. 23,

1893, c. 41.) Receiving-boxes in buildings; chutes as part of receiving-boxes. That no boxes for the collection of mail matter by carriers shall be placed inside of any building except a public building, or a building which is freely open to the public during business hours, or a railroad station, and that the Postmaster-General is hereby authorized, in his discretion, to declare by official order that the chutes connected with mail boxes that are attached to any chute or device which may be approved by him are a part of said receiving boxes and under the exclusive care and custody of the Post-Office Department. (24 Stat. 569. 27 Stat. 421.)

This was a proviso annexed to an appropriation for the free-delivery service in the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1888, cited above.

It was amended by Act Jan. 23, 1893, c. 41, cited above, by adding, at the end of the proviso as originally enacted, the provision beginning with the words "and that the Postmaster-General is hereby authorized," etc., to the end of the proviso as set forth here.

It superseded a provision on the same subject of Act Feb. 21, 1879, c. 95, $ 4, 20 Stat. 317, amended by Act Aug. 2, 1882, c. 373, & 2, 22 Stat. 185.

(R. S. § 3869. Repealed.) This section made it punishable maliciously and willfully to injure, tear down, or destroy any letter box, etc., or to assault a uniformed carrier while in the discharge of his duty. It was incorporated into the Criminal Code, in section 198 thereof, post, $ 10368, and was repealed by section 341 thereof, post, 10515.

The amendment by Act March 3, 1903, c. 1009, $ 3, 32 Stat. 1175, of Act April 21, 1902, c. 563, § 1, 32 Stat. 113, which contained provisions similar to those of Rev. St. $ 3869, in regard to letter boxes on rural free-delivery routes or other mail routes and mail matter deposited in such boxes, was also incorporated in said section 198 of the Criminal Code, post, $ 10368, and was repealed by section 341 thereof, post, $ 10515.

Section of said Act March 3, 1903, c. 1009, relating to special delivery messengers as carriers, etc., within R. S. $ 3869, and other sections, was not expressly repealed by said Criminal Code, $ 341, post, $ 10515, and is set

forth post, $ 7291. § 7278. (R. S. § 3870.) Bonds of carriers.

Every letter-carrier shall give bonds, with sureties, to be approved by the Postmaster-General, for the safe custody and delivery of all mail-matter, and the faithful account and payment of all money received by him.

Act June 8, 1872, c. 335, $ 97, 17 Stat. 296.
Provisions for bonds of assistant postmasters and cashiers at first, second,

and third class offices were made by Act June 13, 1898, c. 446, $ 3, ante, § 7232.

Provisions relating to renewal of bonds of carriers and others in the postal

service were made by Act March 3, 1905, c. 1488, ante, $ 7196. § 7279. (R. S. § 3871.) Branch offices.

The Postmaster-General, when the public convenience requires it, may establish within any post-office delivery one or more branch offices for the receipt and delivery of mail-matter and the sale of stamps and envelopes; and he shall prescribe the rules and regulations for the government thereof. But no letter shall be sent for delivery to any branch office contrary to the request of the party to whom it is addressed.

Act June 8, 1872, c. 335, $ 98, 17 Stat. 296. § 7280. (Act June 9, 1896, c. 386.) Restrictions on establishing sta

tions and branches. Hereafter no station, substation, or branch post-office shall be established beyond the corporate limits or boundaries of any city or town in which the principal office to which such station, substation, or branch office is attached is located, except in cases of villages, towns, or cities of fifteen hundred or more inhabitants not distant more than five miles as near as may be from the outer boundary or limits of such city or town in which the principal office is located. (29 Stat. 313.)

This was a provision following an appropriation for the compensation of postmasters in the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1897, cited above.

(R. S. § 3872. Superseded.) This section fixed the rates of postage on newspapers at free-delivery offices.

It was substantially re-enacted by Act March 3, 1879, c. 180, $ 25, post, $

7360. § 7281. (R. S. § 3873.) Extra postage or carriers' fees prohibited.

No extra postage or carriers' fees shall be charged or collected upon any mail-matter collected or delivered by carriers.

Act June 8, 1872, c. 335, $ 100, 17 Stat. 296. § 7282. (R. S. § 3874.) Expenses of carriers and branch offices.

All expenses of letter-carriers, branch offices, and receiving-boxes, or incident thereto, shall be kept and reported in a separate account, and shall be shown in comparison with the proceeds from postage on local mail-matter at each office, and the Postmaster-General shall be guided in the expenditures for this branch of the service by the income derived therefrom.

Act June 8, 1872, c. 335, $ 101, 17 Stat. 296.

R. S. $ 3735, ante, $ 6888, provided that it should not be lawful for any of the Executive Departments to make contracts for stationery or other supplies for a longer term than one year from the time the contract was made; but the Postmaster-General was authorized to make contracts for necessary supplies for the free-delivery service for a period not exceeding four years, by Act March 2, 1889, c. 374, § 1, post, $ 7283.

The Postmaster-General was required to submit annual estimates in detail for the expenses of the free-delivery service by Act March 3, 1897, c. 385, ante, $ 6712.

§ 7283. (Act March 2, 1889, c. 374, § 1.) Contracts for supplies for

free-delivery service may be made for four years. The Postmaster General may, when if in his judgment the good of the service so requires make contract for necessary supplies for the free-delivery service for a period not exceeding four years. (25 Stat. 844.)

This was a proviso annexed to an appropriation for the free-delivery service in the postal appropriation act for the fiscal year 1890, cited above.

Contracts by any of the Executive Departuents for supplies were limited to one year by R. S. § 3735, ante, & 6888.

§ 7284. (Act March 3, 1885, c. 342, § 3, as amended, Act Jan. 16,

1889, c. 50.) Special delivery of letters; special stamps; collec

tion of deficient postage. A special stamp of the face valuation of ten cents may be provided and issued, whenever deemed advisable or expedient, in such form and bearing such device as may meet the approval of the Postmaster-General, which, when attached to a letter, in addition to the lawful postage thereon, the delivery of which is to be at a free delivery office, or at any city, town, or village containing a population of four thousand or over, according to the Federal census, shall be regarded as entitling such letter to immediate delivery within the carrier limit of any free delivery office which may be designated by the Postmaster-General as a special delivery office, or within one mile of the post office at any other office coming within the provisions of this section which may in like manner be designated as a special delivery office: Provided, however, That the omission by the sender to place the lawful postage upon a letter bearing such special delivery stamp and otherwise entitled to immediate delivery under the provisions of this section shall not hinder or delay the transmission and delivery thereof as provided herein, but such lawful postage shall be collected upon its delivery, in the manner now provided by law for the collection of deficient postage resulting from the overweight of letters. (23 Stat. 387. 25 Stat. 650.)

This section was part of the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1886, cited above.

The section, as originally enacted, did not contain the proviso annexed thereto, as set forth here. Said proviso was added thereto by amendment by Act Jan. 16, 1889, c. 50, last cited above.

Section 4 of this act provided that specially stamped letters should be delivered from 7 a. m. till midnight at the designated offices. It was superseded by provisions authorizing the Postmaster-General to prescribe the hours for delivery of Act Aug. 4, 1886, c. 901, § 2, post, $ 7288.

Sections 5 and 6 of the act are set forth post, $8 7285, 7286. The system of special delivery of letters established by this section and sections 4, 5, of this act, was extended to the special delivery of every mailable article properly stamped with a special delivery stamp, by Act Aug. 4, 1886, c. 901, post, 88 7287–7290.

Provisions for the manufacture of special delivery stamps were made by Act April 21, 1902, c. 563, § 1, post, § 7387.

Provisions for the use of ordinary stamps for the special delivery of mail matter were made by Act March 2, 1907, c. 2561, post, $ 7293.

$ 7285. (Act March 3, 1885, c. 342, $ 5.) Employment of persons

to deliver letters specially stamped. To provide for the immediate delivery of letters bearing the special stamp, the postmaster at any office which may come within the provisions of this act may, with the approval of the PostmasterGeneral, employ such person or persons as may actually be required for such service, who, upon the delivery of such letter, will procure a receipt from the party addressed, or some one authorized to receive it, in a book to be furnished for the purpose, which shall, when not in use, be kept in the post-office, and at all times subject to examination by an inspector of the Department. (23 Stat. 388.)

See notes to section 3 of this act, ante, 8 7284. The employment of clerks and assistants at third and fourth class offices as special-delivery messengers was authorized by Act Aug. 4, 1886, c. 901, $ 1, post, $ 7287.

Allowances for car fare for special-delivery messengers in certain cases

were authorized by a provision of Act June 2, 1900, c. 613, § 1, post, $ 7292. § 7286. (Act March 3, 1885, c. 342, § 6, as amended, Act March 3,

1903, c. 1009, $ 2.) Compensation of persons employed to make

special deliveries. To provide for the payment of such persons as may be employed for this service, the postmaster at any office designated by section three of this Act shall keep a record of the number of letters received at such office bearing such special stamp, which number shall correspond with the number entered in the receipt books heretofore specified, and at the end of each month he may pay to such person or persons employed a sum not exceeding eighty per centum of the face value of all such stamps received and recorded during that month: Provided, That nothing in this Act shall interfere with the prompt delivery of letters as now provided by law or regulations of the Post-Office Department. (23 Stat. 388. 32 Stat. 1175.)

See notes to section 3 of this act, ante, 8 7284. The amendment of this section by Act March 3, 1903, c. 1009, $ 2, last cited above, consisted chiefly in the omission of a proviso, contained in the section as originally enacted, which limited the compensation to be paid to

any one person to $30 per month. § 7287. (Act Aug. 4, 1886, c. 901, § 1.) Special-delivery privileges

extended to all mailable matter; employment of messengers;

contracts and compensation. Every article of mailable matter upon which the special stamp provided for by section three of the act of Congress approved March third, eighteen hundred and eighty-five, entitled "An act making appropriations for the service of the Post-Office Department for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and eighty-six, and for other purposes,” shall be duly affixed, shall be entitled to immediate delivery, according to said act within the carrier-delivery limit of any free-delivery office, and within one mile of any other post office which the Postmaster-General shall at any time designate as a special-delivery post-office. The postmaster shall be responsible for such immediate delivery of every such article,

and shall cause delivery to be made of all such articles received at his office bearing such stamp and entitled to delivery thereat, and may employ any persons, including clerks and assistants, at third and fourth class offices, as messengers, on such terms as he shall fix as compensation for such delivery; and to defray the expense thereof, such postmaster shall be entitled, upon the adjustment of his quarterly account, to eighty per centum of the face value of all such special-delivery stamps received at his office and recorded, according to said act and regulations of the Post-Office Department during the quarter; and such allowance shall be in full of all the expenses of such delivery: Provided, That the Postmaster-General may, in his discretion, direct any free-delivery office to be excepted from the foregoing provision, and require the delivery to be made entirely by special messengers, according to the provisions of the act to which this is amendatory: And provided further, That he may contract for the immediate delivery of all articles from any post-office at any price less than eight cents per piece, when he shall deem it expedient. (24 Stat. 220.)

This section and the three sections next following were an act entitled "An act to extend the system for the immediate delivery of letters, and amendatory of sections three, four and five of the Act approved March third, eighteen hundred and eighty-five, entitled 'An act making appropriations for the service of the Post-Office Department for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and eighty-six, and for other purposes.'

Act March 3, 1885, c. 342, & 3, mentioned in this section, is set forth ante, 8 7284.

Postmasters were divided into four classes by Act July 12, 1876, c. 179, § 5, ante, & 7189.

The employment of salaried clerks, etc., for effecting special delivery in first and second class post-offices was authorized by Act June 2, 1902, c. 613,

§ 1, post, $ 7292. § 7288. (Act Aug. 4, 1886, c. 901, § 2.) Regulations for special

delivery service. The Postmaster-General shall prescribe suitable regulations, not inconsistent with law, for the performance of the immediate-delivery service, the keeping of the records and rendering of accounts thereof, and all matters connected therewith, and may prescribe the hours within which such immediate delivery shall be made at any post-office. (24 Stat. 221.)

See notes to section 1 of this act, ante, $ 7287. This section superseded the provisions prescribing the hours for delivery of specially stamped letters of Act March 3, 1885, C. 342, § 4, 23 Stat. 388.

See notes to section 3 of that act, ante, § 7284. § 7289. (Act Aug. 4, 1886, c. 901, § 3.) False returns by post

masters; penalty; compensation in case of false return. Any postmaster, or any assistant postmaster, clerk, or employee of a postmaster, who shall make any false return or record of the receipt or delivery of any article of mailable matter as being stamped with a special-delivery stamp, or shall make any false return of the number of articles specially delivered from his office, for the purpose of increasing his compensation under the provisions of this act, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and, on conviction

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