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§ 7262. (Act March 4, 1911, c. 241, § 1.) Contracts for not exceed

ing four years for rental of canceling machines, hire of equip

ages for city delivery service, collection service, etc. Hereafter the Postmaster General may, in his discretion, enter into contracts for a period of not exceeding four years for the rental of canceling machines, for the hire of the equipages for the City Delivery Service, for the collection service by means of boxes attached to street cars, and for the steamboat and other equipment necessary for the Detroit River postal service. (36 Stat. 1333.)

This was a further provision of the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1912, cited above.

Provisions in previous similar appropriation acts relating to the terms of contracts for particular purposes included in this paragraph, were superseded by this provision.

Subsequent provisions concerning contracts for the rental of canceling

machines were made by Act March 4, 1913, c. 143, post, & 7263. § 7263. (Act March 4, 1913, c. 143.) Contracts for rental of can

celing machines; maximum rent; advertisement for bids. Hereafter no contract shall be made for any canceling machine for more than $270 per annum, including repairs on said machines, and that all contracts entered into shall be let after having advertised for bids, and shall be awarded on the basis of cheapness and efficiency. (37 Stat. 795.)

This was a provision accompanying an appropriation for the rental and purchase of canceling machines, in the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1914, cited above.

It superseded a provision in the same language accompanying a similar appropriation for the preceding fiscal year, Act Aug. 24, 1912, c. 389, § 1, 37

Stat. 544. § 7264. (Act March 2, 1895, c. 177, § 1.) Contracts for printing

post-route maps may be made for four years. The Postmaster-General may, in his discretion, cause the contract for printing post-route maps to be let for a term of four years. (28 Stat. 803.)

This was a provision of the legislative, executive, and judicial appropriation act for the fiscal year 1896, cited above.

Contracts by any of the Executive Departments for supplies were limited

to one year by R. S. § 3735, ante, $ 6888. § 7265. (Act May 28, 1896, c. 252, § 1.) Contracts for furnishing

Official Postal Guide may be made for four years. The Postmaster-General may, in his discretion, cause the contract for furnishing the Official Postal Guide to be let for a term of four years. (29 Stat. 176.)

This was a provision of the legislative, executive, and judicial appropriation act for the fiscal year 1897, cited above.

Contracts by any of the Executive Departments for supplies were limited to one year by R. S. § 3735, ante, & 6888. § 7266. (Act Aug. 24, 1912, c. 389, § 2.). Contracts for supplies

with persons combining to fix prices, etc., forbidden; penalty. No contract for furnishing supplies to the Post Office Department or the postal service shall be made with any person who has entered, or proposed to enter, into any combination to prevent the

making of any bid for furnishing such supplies, or to fix a price or prices therefor, or who has made any agreement, or given or performed, or promised to give or perform, any consideration whatever to induce any other person not to bid for any sucli contract, or to bid at a specified price or prices thereon; and if any person so offending is a contractor for furnishing such supplies, his contract may be annulled, and the person so offending shall be liable to a fine of not less than one hundred dollars nor more than five thousand dollars, and may be further punished, in the discretion of the court, by imprisonment for not less than three months nor more than one year. (37 Stat. 553.)

This section was part of the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1913, cited above. § 7267. (R. S. § 3861.) Deductions out of receipts.

The salary of a postmaster, and such other expenses of the postal service authorized by law as may be incurred by him, and for which appropriations have been made, may be deducted out of the receipts of his office, under the direction of the Postmaster-General.

Act June 8, 1872, c. 335, $ 88, 17 Stat. 295. § 7268. (R. S. § 3862.) Deductions to be audited.

Vouchers for all deductions made by a postmaster out of the receipts of his office, on account of the expenses of the postal service, shall be submitted for examination and settlement to the Sixth Auditor, and no such deduction shall be valid unless found to be in conformity with law.

Act June 8, 1872, c. 335, § 89, 17 Stat. 295. § 7269. (R. S. § 3863.) Extra labor at offices.

Whenever unusual business accrues at any post-office, the Postmaster-General shall make a special order allowing reasonable compensation for clerical service, and a proportionate increase of salary to the postmaster during the time of such extraordinary business.

Act June 8, 1872, c. 335, § 90, 17 Stat. 296.

Provisions for procuring services of efficient employés where unusual condi

tions exist were made by Act March 4, 1911, c. 241, § 1, ante, $ 7255. § 7270. (R. S. $ 3864.) Discontinuing offices.

The Postmaster-General may discontinue any post-office where the safety and security of the postal service and revenues are endangered from any cause whatever, or where the efficiency of the service requires such discontinuance, and he shall promptly certify such discontinuance to the Sixth Auditor.

Act June 8, 1872, c. 335, $ 91, 17 Stat. 296.

It was made the duty of the Postmaster-General to establish and continue post-offices by R. S. § 396, ante, $ 582, but post-offices at county seats were

to be continued by Act June 9, 1896, c. 386, post, $ 7271. § 7271. (Act June 9, 1896, c. 386, as amended, Act Aug. 24, 1912,

c. 389, § 1.) Post-offices at county seats to be continued. No post-office established at any county seat shall be abolished or discontinued by reason of any consolidation of post-offices made by the Postmaster-General under existing law, and any such postoffice at a county seat heretofore consolidated shall be established COMP.ST.'13–204

(3249)

as a separate post-office at such county seat: Provided, however, That this provision shall not apply to the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, or to Towson, Maryland, or to Clayton, Saint Louis County, Missouri. (29 Stat. 313. 37 Stat. 545.)

This was a provision following an appropriation for the compensation of postmasters in the postal service appropriation act for the, fiscal year 1897, cited abve.

The proviso annexed to this provision, as originally enacted, did not contain the clause, "or to Clayton; Saint Louis County, Missouri,” at the end thereof as set forth here. Those words were added by amendment by Act Aug. 24, 1912, c. 389, § 1, last cited above.

CHAPTER TWO
Carriers, Branch Offices, and Receiving-Boxes
Sec.

Sec. 7272. Letter-carrier delivery.

7291. Special delivery messengers deem7273. Letter carriers on consolidation

ed carriers. of post-offices.

7292. Allowance for car fare for spe7274. Experimental delivery in towns

cial delivery messengers in firstand villages.

class offices; delivery by clerks, 7275. Uniform for carriers; penalty for

etc., in first and second class unauthorized wearing.

offices. 7276. Receiving-boxes.

7293. Special delivery of letters; use of 7277. Receiving-boxes in buildings;

ordinary stamps instead of spechutes as part of receiving

cial delivery stamp. boxes.

7294. Rural free-delivery service; spe7278. Bonds of carriers.

cial agents; route inspectors; 7279. Branch offices.

clerks; carriers; substitute car7280. Restrictions on establishing sta

riers; classification; compensations and branches.

tion. 7281. Extra postage or carriers' fees 7295. Special agents in charge of diprohibited.

visions of rural free-delivery 7282. Expenses of carriers and branch

service designated division suoffices.

perintendents; special agents 7283. Contracts for supplies for free

and route inspectors designated delivery service may be made

rural agents. for four years.

7296. Carriers of rural free-delivery 7284. Special delivery of letters; spe

service; salaries; restrictions; cial stamps; collection of defi

carrying merchandise. cient postage.

7297. Superintendents of division, rural 7285. Employment of persons to deliv

delivery, and rural agents, to be er letters specially stamped.

appointed post-office inspectors. 7286. Compensation of persons employ. 7298. Carriers of rural delivery service; ed to make special deliveries.

salaries; leave of absence; sub7287. Special-delivery privileges extend

stitutes; clerks in charge of subed to all mailable matter; em

stations. ployment of messengers; 7299. Compensation of carriers on watracts and compensation.

ter routes furnishing power 7288. Regulations for special-delivery

boats. service.

7300. Carriers, clerks, etc., of rural de7289. False returns by postmasters;

livery service; salaries; carpenalty; compensation in case

rier on Lake Winnepesaukee of false return.

furnishing power boat. 7290. Persons making immediate deliv 7301. Rural free delivery special agents, ery deemed employés in postal

route inspectors, etc., authority service.

to administer oaths.

CON

(R. S. $$ 3865, 3866. Superseded.) R. S. $ 3865, provided for the employment of letter-carriers for the free delivery of mail matter at places having a population of 50,000 or more within the delivery of the post-office, and authorized their employment at places containing not less than 20,000.

It was modified by Act June 23, 1874, c. 456, § 1, 18 Stat. 231, which provided that carriers should not be employed in places having less than 30,000 inhabitants, without, however, affecting free delivery in towns already established.

It was also modified by Act Feb. 21, 1879, c. 95, § 5, 20 Stat 317, which provided for the appointment of letter-carriers in post-offices provided for in section 3865, and also in offices which produced a gross revenue of not less than $20,000 a year.

R. S. § 3866, authorized the Postmaster-General to fix the salaries of the carriers, not exceeding $800 a year, with the right to increase it in certain cases to any sum not exceeding $1,000, and in San Francisco he was authorized to pay such additional salaries as would secure the services of competent persons.

It was modified by Act Feb. 21, 1879, c. 95, $$ 1, 2, 20 Stat. 317, and section 3, as amended by Act Aug. 2, 1882, c. 373, § 1, 22 Stat. 185, which provided for the classification and compensation of carriers.

Both these sections were superseded by Act Jan. 3, 1887, c. 14, post, $ 7272.

§ 7272. (Act Jan. 3, 1887, c. 14, § 1.) Letter-carrier delivery.

Letter-carriers shall be employed for the free delivery of mailmatter, as frequently as the public business may require, at every incorporated city, village, or borough containing a population of fifty thousand within its corporate limits, and may be so employed at every place containing a population of not less than ten thousand, within its corporate limits, according to the last general census, taken by authority of State or United States law, or at any post-office which produced a gross revenue, for the preceding fiscal year, of not less than ten thousand dollars: Provided, This act shall not affect the existence of the free delivery in places where it is now established: And provided further, That in offices where the free delivery shall be established under the provisions of this act, such free delivery shall not be abolished by reason of decrease below ten thousand in population or ten thousand dollars in gross postal revenue, except in the discretion of the Postmaster-General. (24 Stat. 355.)

This was the first section of an act entitled "An act to extend the freedelivery system of the post-office, and for other purposes."

Section 2 of said act provided that in cities containing a population of 75,000 or more there should be three classes of carriers, and fixed the compensation of each class. Section 3 provided that in places containing a population of less than 75,000 there should be two classes of carriers and fixed the compensation of carriers of each class. Both these sections were superseded by provisions for the grading and compensation of clerks in first and second class offices and carriers in the city delivery service, of Act March 2, 1907, c. 2513, ante, & 7236. The first grade for clerks and carriers established by said Act March 2, 1907, c. 2513, was abolished by Act March 4, 1913, c. 143, ante, & 7237.

Section 4 of the act of which this section was a part repealed all acts and parts of acts in conflict therewith. This section superseded R. S. § 3865, and part of Act June 23, 1874, c.

456, § 1, 18 Stat. 231, and Act Feb. 21, 1879, c. 95, § 5, 20 Stat. 317. See note under R. S. § 3865, ante.

Provisions relating to officers of the free-delivery service in the Post-Office Department are set forth or referred to ante, under Title IX, “The Post Office Department."

Provisions relating to the employment of letter carriers where post offices are consolidated were made by Act Feb. 16, 1911, c. 87, post, & 7273.

Provisions relating to rural free-delivery service, authorizing the classification and compensation of employés in such service, were made by Act April 21, 1902, c. 563, § 1, Act June 26, 1906, c. 3546, and Act March 2, 1907, c. 2513, post, $8 7294, 7297, 7298.

The establishment of experimental free delivery in towns and villages having post-offices of the second and third class and not entitled by law to free delivery service was authorized by Act Aug. 24, 1912, c. 389, $ 9, post,

$ 7274. § 7273. (Act Feb. 16, 1911, c. 87.) Letter carriers on consolidation

of post offices. Hereafter when two or more post-offices situated within the corporate limits of any city, village, or borough are consolidated by authority of the Postmaster-General, and the said offices together produced a gross revenue for the preceding fiscal year of not less than ten thousand dollars, letter carriers may be employed for the free delivery of mail matter in like manner as if any one of such post-offices had produced such revenue in said fiscal year. (36 Stat. 911.)

This was an act entitled "An act to authorize the employment of letter

carriers at certain post-offices." $ 7274. (Act Aug. 24, 1912, c. 389, $ 9.) Experimental delivery in

towns and villages. After June thirtieth, nineteen hundred and twelve, experimental mail delivery may be established, under such regulations as the Postmaster General may prescribe, in towns and villages having post offices of the second or third class that are not by law now entitled to free delivery service, and the sum of one hundred thousand dollars is hereby appropriated to enable postmasters to employ the necessary assistance to deliver the mail in such villages, and the amount to be expended at any office shall not exceed one thousand eight hundred dollars a year. (37 Stat. 559.)

This section was part of the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal

year 1913, cited above. § 7275. (R. S. § 3867.) Uniform for carriers; penalty for unau

thorized wearing. The Postmaster-General may prescribe a uniform dress to be worn by letter-carriers.

Act June 8, 1872, c. 335, $ 94, 17 Stat. 296.

This section, as enacted in the Revised Statutes, contained a further provision making it punishable for any person not connected with the lettercarrier branch of the postal service to wear the uniform prescribed for carriers. That provision was incorporated in the Criminal Code, in section 187 thereof, post, $ 10357, and was repealed by section 341 thereof, post, $ 10515.

Postal clerks, route agents, and mail route messengers were not to be required to wear a uniform other than a cap or badge, by Act March 3, 1879. c. 180, § 1, ante, $ 7251.

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