Westmorland, Cumberland, Durham & Northumberland, illustr. from drawings by T. Allom, with descriptions by T. Rose

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Page 47 - O, how canst thou renounce the boundless store Of charms which Nature to her votary yields ! The warbling woodland, the resounding shore, The pomp of groves, and garniture of fields ; All that the genial ray of morning gilds, And all that echoes to the song of even, All that the mountain's sheltering bosom shields, And all the dread magnificence of Heaven...
Page 72 - Ever charming, ever new, When will the landscape tire the view; The fountain's fall, the river's flow, The woody valleys, warm and low ; The windy summit, wild and high, Roughly rushing on the sky! The pleasant seat, the ruined tower, The naked rock, the shady bower ; The town and village, dome and farm, Each give each a double charm, As pearls upon an ^Ethiop's arm.
Page 51 - The western waves of ebbing day Rolled o'er the glen their level way; Each purple peak, each flinty spire. Was bathed in floods of living fire.
Page 43 - Smooth to the shelving brink a copious Flood Rolls fair, and placid ; where collected all, In one impetuous torrent, down the steep It thundering shoots, and shakes the country round.
Page 35 - Innumerable multitude of forms Scattered through half the circle of the sky ; And giving back, and shedding each on each, With prodigal communion, the bright...
Page 17 - Not raised in nice proportions was the pile, But large and massy ; for duration built ; "With pillars crowded, and the roof upheld By naked rafters intricately crossed, Like leafless underboughs, in some thick wood, All withered by the depth of shade above.
Page 37 - When the broken arches are black in night, And each shafted oriel glimmers white ; When the cold light's uncertain shower Streams on the ruined central tower ; When buttress and buttress, alternately, Seem framed of ebon and ivory ; When silver edges the imagery, And the scrolls that teach thee to live and die...
Page 57 - With what attractive charms this goodly frame Of Nature touches the consenting hearts Of mortal men; and what the pleasing stores Which beauteous Imitation thence derives To deck the poet's or the painter's toil, My verse unfolds.
Page 33 - This lamentable tale I tell! A lasting monument of words This wonder merits well. The Dog, which still was hovering nigh, Repeating the same timid cry, This Dog had been, through three months' space, A dweller in that savage place.
Page 37 - IF thou wouldst view fair Melrose aright, Go visit it by the pale moonlight; For the gay beams of lightsome day Gild but to flout the ruins grey.

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