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1. DIFFICULTY of the first address. Practice of the

epic poets. Convenience of periodical per-

formances..........................

2. The necessity and danger of looking into futurity.

Writers naturally sanguine, Their hopes liable

to disappointment ................

3. An allegory on criticism.........

4. The modern form of romances preferable to the

ancient. The necessity of characters morally

good ..............

5. A meditation on the spring....................

6. Happiness not local..................

7. Retirement natural to a great mind. Its religious

use ............

............

8. The thoughts to be brought under regulation; as

they respect the past, present, and future......

9. The fondness of every man for his profession. The

gradual improvement of manufactures ............

10. Four billets with their answers. Remarks on mas-

querades...........................

11. The folly of anger. The misery of a peevish old

age........................

12. The history of a young woman that came to Lon-

don for a service ...........

...........

13. The duty of secresy. The invalidity of all ex-

cuses for betraying secrets ..........

14. The difference between an author's writings and

his conversation ...........

............

15. The folly of cards. A letter from a lady that has

lost her money......

16. The dangers and miseries of literary eminence....

17. The frequent contemplation of death necessary to

moderate the passions.......

18. The unhappiness of marriage caused by irregular

motives of choice.............

19. The danger of ranging from one study to another.

The importance of the early choice of a pro-

fession....... ............................................... 109

20. The folly and inconvenience of affectation ..........

21. The anxieties of literature not 'less than those of

public stations. The inequality of authors' writ-

ings.

121

...........

132

.......... 137

148

167

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22. An allegory on wit and learning........................ 127

23. The contrariety of criticism. The vanity of objec-

tion. An author obliged to depend upon his

own judgment.............

24. The necessity of attending to the duties of com-

mon life. The natural character not to be for-

saken.............

25. Rashness preferable to cowardice. Enterprise not

to be repressed .......

........ 142

1

26. The mischief of extravagance, and misery of de-

pendance..................................................

27. An author's treatment from six patrons............... 154

28. The various arts of self-delusion............................

29. The folly of anticipating misfortunes................

30. The observance of Sunday recommended ; an al-

... 171

31. The defence of a known mistake highly culpable.. 176

32. The vanity of stoicism. The necessity of pa-

tience....................................................... 182

33. An allegorical history of rest and labour..............

34. The uneasiness and disgust of female cowardice.. 193

35. A marriage of prudence without affection..... 199

36. The reasons why pastorals delight ..................... 205

37. The true principles of pastoral poetry ................ 210

38. The advantages of mediocrity. An eastern fable..

39. The unhappiness of women, whether single or mar-

ried...........................................

.............. 222

40. The difficulty of giving advice without offending... 227

41. The advantages of memory........

42. The inisery of a inodish lady in solitude ............. 239

43, The, inconveniences of precipitation and confi-

dence.............................

244

44. Religion and superstition, a vision............ 250

45. The causes of disagreement in marriage........... 256

46. The mischiefs of rural faction.

261

47. The proper means of regulating sorrow .............. 266

48. The miseries of an infirm constitution ...... 272

49. A disquisition upon the value of fame ................. 277

50. A virtuous old age always reverenced............... 282.

51. The employments of a housewife in the country.... 287

52. The contemplation of the calamities of others a

remedy for grief.....................

294

53. The folly and misery of a spendthrift........ 299

54. A death-bed the true school of wisdom, The ef-

fects of death upon the survivors .................... 304

..... 233

2

THE

RAMBLER..

No 1. TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 1750.

Cur tamen hoc libeat potius decurrere campo,
Per quem magnus equos Aurunca flexit alumnus,
Si vacat, et placidi rationem admittitis, edam.

JUV.
Why to expatiate in this beaten field,
Why arms oft us'd in vain, I mean to wield;
If time permit, and candour will attend,
Some satisfaction, this essay may lend.

ELPHINSTON. The difficulty of the first address on any new occasion, is felt by every man in his transactions with the world, and confessed by the settled and regular forms of salutation which necessity has introduced into all languages. Judgment was wearied with the perplexity of being forced upon choice, where there was no motive to preference; and it was found convenient that some easy method of introduction should be estab. lished, which, if it wanted the allurement of novelty, might enjoy the security of prescription.

Perhaps few authors have presented themselves before the public, without wishing that such ceremonial modes of entrance had been anciently established, as might have freed them from those dangers

VOL. I,

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