Miscellaneous Essays and Lays of Ancient Rome

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Cosimo, Inc., 2005 - 552 pages
The Essays and Lays of Ancient Rome is one of the most famous epic poems of the Victorian era. A stirring teacher of Roman history accenting the virtues of courage, sacrifice, and determination, it has been required reading for British students for nearly a hundred years and is well known for its action, spirit, and daring adventure.AUTHOR BIO: Thomas Babington MacAulay (1800-1859) was an English historian and author born in Leicestershire and educated at Cambridge University. During his early career, he was a member of the Supreme Council of the East India Company, reformed the Indian educational system, and composed a legal code for the colony. On his return to England, Macaulay devoted himself to writing history, but returned to public office as secretary of war, paymaster of the forces, and a noted member of Parliament. MacAulay's works include The History of England from the Accession of James the Second.

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User Review  - Lukerik - LibraryThing

It would be scarcely possible for a man of Mr Macaulay's talents and acquirements to write a volume so large as that before us, which should be wholly destitute of information and amusement. He writes ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
39
III
77
IV
103
V
182
VI
195
VII
208
VIII
222
XX
472
XXI
483
XXII
486
XXIII
489
XXIV
490
XXV
492
XXVI
493
XXVII
495

IX
255
X
272
XI
311
XII
323
XIII
332
XIV
386
XV
392
XVI
405
XVII
418
XVIII
435
XIX
459
XXVIII
498
XXIX
499
XXX
500
XXXI
517
XXXII
518
XXXIII
520
XXXIV
524
XXXV
525
XXXVI
526
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Page 431 - Alone stood brave Horatius, But constant still in mind ; Thrice thirty thousand foes before, And the broad flood behind. " Down with him ! " cried false Sextus, With a smile on his pale face. "Now yield thee," cried Lars Porsena,
Page 486 - Forthwith a guard at every gun was placed along the wall ; The beacon blazed upon the roof of Edgecumbe's lofty hall ; Many a light fishing-bark put out to pry along the coast ; And with loose rein and bloody spur rode inland many a post.
Page 424 - Fast by the royal standard, O'erlooking all the war, Lars Porsena of Clusium Sat in his ivory car. By the right wheel rode Mamilius, Prince of the Latian name; And by the left false Sextus, That wrought the deed of shame.
Page 427 - Aruns of Volsinium, Who slew the great wild boar, The great wild boar that had his den Amidst the reeds of Cosa's fen, And wasted fields, and slaughtered men, Along Albinia's shore. Herminius smote down Aruns ; Lartius laid Ocnus low ; Right to the heart of Lausulus Horatius sent a blow : "Lie there...
Page 47 - And during the whole speech of the ghost, he sat with his eyes fixed partly on the ghost and partly on Hamlet, and with his mouth open; the same passions which succeeded each other in Hamlet succeeding likewise in him. When the scene was over, Jones said, Why, Partridge, you exceed my expectations. You enjoy the play more than I conceived possible.
Page 31 - Hume is an accomplished advocate. Without positively asserting much more than he can prove, he gives prominence to all the circumstances which support his case ; he glides lightly over those which are unfavourable to it ; his own witnesses are applauded and encouraged ; the statements which seem to throw discredit on them are controverted ; the contradictions into which they fall are explained away ; a clear and connected abstract of their evidence is given. Everything that is offered on the other...
Page 37 - The father shall be divided against the son, and the son against the father; the mother against the daughter, and the daughter against the mother; the mother in law against her daughter in law, and the daughter in law against her mother in law.
Page 429 - Right firmly pressed his heel, And thrice and four times tugged amain, Ere he wrenched out the steel. 'And see...

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