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IN RETIREMENT: WORK AS AN AUTHOR [1691–1696].

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269-281

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The Reasonableness of Christianity as delivered in the Scriptures'-

Locke's view of a reasonable Christianity-Adam's fall; death and

original sin ;” the redemption by Christ; the nature of Christ's

inission ; Christian ethics—opposition to Locke's treatise—his first

"Vindication'.

281-293

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the censorship of the press-political changes— Old England's Legal

Constitution '--share in the reform of the currency and the new

coinage-'Further Considerations concerning Raising the Value of

Money '--the re-coinage bill and its issue-tracts and correspondence

on the subject

309-343

Occupations as commissioner of appeals .

344-346

The commission of trade and plantations--Locke's appointment as a

member of it, his share in its duties--his proposed resignation-his

efforts and proposals to encourage the linen manufacture in Ireland

-other work-his scheme for reform of the poor laws-his resigna-

tion

346--394

An offer of fresh employment and its issue-political changes—A

Letter,' in satirical verse, on Somers's dismissal from the lord chan-

cellorship

394-403

CHAPTER XIV.

CONTROVERSY : LATER WRITINGS [1696—1700).

1

Locke's share in the trinitarian controversy.-Bury's 'Naked Gospel' and

the unitarian tracts-Edwards's attacks on Locke and his ‘Second
Vindication of the Reasonableness of Christianity'-Toland's 'Chris-

Locke's miscellaneous occupations and correspondence between 1696 and

1700—his cousin, Peter King-Rebecca Collier, the quaker preacher
-letters to Esther Masham-failing health and serious illness in
1698—Molyneux's political troubles-his visit to London and death
-correspondence with Limborch and Thoynard--a letter on reading
and study-a plan for reforming the calendar

4504478

6

Retirement at Oates-illness in 1700 and the following winter-a new

year's letter to Thoynard-Locke's interest in political affairs--advice
to Peter King-Limborch's son-occupations at Oates-controversy
with Limborch-biblical studies—an essay and commentaries on
Paul's epistles

479–501

William the Third's last parliament and the war of the Spanish succession

-medical advice to Limborch— Benjamin Furly and his son Arent-.
the Earl of Peterborough's visit to Oates--a last letter to Edward
Clark—acquaintance with Anthony Collins and correspondence with
him-a fourth ‘Letter on Toleration'

501-524

Review of Locke's work and character-his achievements in philosophy

and other studies-his services in practical affairs-his temper and

bearing among his friends—the grace and versatility of his disposi-

tion-his humour-his charity-his hot temper-his trustworthiness

-his personal habits-his reading and mode of study.

524-540

Locke's will—his increasing illness-visits from Peter King, Anthony

Collins, and others—his new carriage-last letters to Limborch,
Collins and King-King's wedding entertainment-Locke's last days
-his death-his epitaph .

540_561

INDEX

562-574

UTIVIRSITY

CALIFORNIA

THE LIFE OF JOHN LOCKE.

CHAPTER IX.

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RESIDENCE IN HOLLAND.

[1683-1689.) OCKE was in his fifty-second year when he went into

voluntary exile in Holland. In 1660, when he was twenty-seven, the presbyterian tyranny of the dying Commonwealth had not weakened his love of liberty, but had crushed his hopes of seeing it secured by the methods with which in his youth he must have been taught to sympathise. “I find,” he had then written, “that a general freedom is but a general bondage, that the popular assertors of public liberty are the greatest engrossers of it too. I therefore cannot but entertain the approaches of a calm with the greatest joy and satisfaction; and this, methinks, obliges me, both in duty and gratitude, to endeavour the continuance of such a blessing by disposing men's minds to obedience to that government which has brought with it the quiet settlement which even our giddy folly had put beyond the reach, not only of our contrivance, but hopes.” Not then, or for some time afterwards, making politics his special business, but resolving to be a student of philosophy and science-believing that he could best do

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VOL. II.

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