Historical Romances: The Prince and the Pauper, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc

Front Cover
In the three novels collected in this Library of America volume, Mark Twain turned his comic genius to a period that fascinated and repelled him in equal measure: medieval and Renaissance Europe. This lost world of stately pomp and unspeakable cruelty, artistic splendor and abysmal ignorance--the seeming opposite of brashly optimistic, commercial, democratic nineteenth-century America--engaged Twain's imagination, inspiring a children's classic, and astonishing fantasy of comedy and violence, and an unusual fictional biography.

Twain drew on his fascination with impersonation and the theme of the double in The Prince and the Pauper (1882), which brilliantly uses the device of identical boys from opposite ends of the social hierarchy to evoke the tumultuous contrasts of Henry VIII's England. As the pauper Tom Canty is raised to the throne, while the rightful heir is cast out among thieves and beggars, Twain sustains one of his most compelling narratives. A perennial children's favorite, the novel brings an impassioned American point of view to the injustices of traditional European society.

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court
(1889) finds Twain in high satiric form. When hard-headed Yankee mechanic Hank Morgan is knocked out in a fight, he wakes up in Camelot in A.D. 528--and finds himself pitted against the medieval rituals and superstitions of King Arthur and his knights. In a hilarious burlesque of the age of chivalry and of its cult in the nineteenth-century American South, Twain demolishes knighthood's romantic aura to reveal a brutish, violent society beset by ignorance. But the comic mood gives way to a darker questioning of both ancient and modern society, culminating in an astonishing apocalyptic conclusion that questions both American progress and Yankee "ingenuity" as Camelot is undone by the introduction of advanced technology.

"Taking into account . . . her origin, youth, sex, illiteracy, early environment, and the obstructing conditions under which she exploited her high gifts and made her conquest in the field and before the courts that tried her for her life--she is easily and by far the most extraordinary person the human race has ever known." So Twain wrote of the heroine of Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (1896), his most elaborate work of historical reconstruction. A respectful and richly detailed chronicle, by turns admiring and indignant, Joan of Arc opens a fascinating window onto the moral imagination of America's greatest comic writer.

LIBRARY OF AMERICA is an independent nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1979 to preserve our nation's literary heritage by publishing, and keeping permanently in print, America's best and most significant writing. The Library of America series includes more than 300 volumes to date, authoritative editions that average 1,000 pages in length, feature cloth covers, sewn bindings, and ribbon markers, and are printed on premium acid-free paper that will last for centuries.
 

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User Review  - auntieknickers - LibraryThing

I've only read The Prince and the Pauper and A Connecticut Yankee... and it was a long time ago, but I recall enjoying them very much although they are not up to the standard of Huckleberry Finn. Read full review

Contents

The Birth of the Prince and the Pauper II
11
Toms Early Life
12
Toms Meeting with the Prince
17
The Princes Troubles Begin
23
s Tom as a Patrician
27
Tom Receives Instructions
34
Toms First Royal Dinner
41
The Question of the Seal
45
CONCLUSION Justice and Retribution
204
NOTES
207
Preface
217
A Word of Explanation
219
Camelot
225
King Arthurs Court
228
Knights of the Table Round
234
Sir Dinadan the Humorist
240

The River Pageant
48
The Prince in the Toils
51
At Guildhall
59
The Prince and His Deliverer
64
The Disappearance of the Prince
74
Le Roi Est Mort Vive le Roi
79
Tom as King
90
The State Dinner
101
FooFoo the First
104
The Prince with the Tramps
114
The Prince with the Peasants
122
The Prince and the Hermit
127
Hendon to the Rescue
133
A Victim of Treachery
138
The Prince a Prisoner
144
The Escape
148
Hendon Hall
151
Disowned
158
In Prison
162
The Sacrifice
171
To London
175
Toms Progress
177
The Recognition Procession
180
Coronation Day
186
Edward as King
197
An Inspiration
243
The Eclipse
249
Merlins Tower
255
The Boss
261
The Tournament
267
Beginnings of Civilization
273
The Yankee in Search of Adventures
278
Slow Torture
286
Freemen
290
Defend Thee Lord
298
Sandys Tale
302
Morgan le Fay
310
A Royal Banquet
316
In the Queens Dungeons
325
KnightErrantry as a Trade
335
The Ogres Castle
338
The Pilgrims
345
PERSONAL RECOLLECTIONS OF JOAN OF ARC
541
Book I
555
Book II
613
Book III
839
Chronology
973
Note on the Texts IO22
1022
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens in Florida, Missouri, in 1835, and died at Redding, Connecticut in 1910. In his person and in his pursuits he was a man of extraordinary contrasts. Although he left school at twelve when his father died, he was eventually awarded honorary degrees from Yale University, the University of Missouri, and Oxford University. His career encompassed such varied occupations as printer, Mississippi riverboat pilot, journalist, travel writer, and publisher. He made fortunes from his writing but toward the end of his life he had to resort to lecture tours to pay his debts. He was hot-tempered, profane, and sentimental--and also pessimistic, cynical, and tortured by self-doubt. His nostalgia helped produce some of his best books. He lives in American letters as a great artist, the writer whom William Dean Howells called "the Lincoln of our literature."
Susan K. Harris is Joyce and Elizabeth Hall Distinguished Professor of American Literature at the University of Kansas.

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